EAST WALL REMEMBERS ANTI-FASCIST BRIGADISTA JACK NALTY

Clive Sulish

On the 80th Anniversary of his death in the Anti-Fascist War in ‘Spain’, the East Wall History Group organised a remembrance of a local man from that dockland Irish area who was the last Irishman to die fighting in the war against Franco and Spanish Fascism. The event was attended by relatives of that Irish antifascist fighter and of another, by a cross-section of Left and Irish Republicans, including historians and by a number of elected representatives from the Dublin City Council and the Dáil (Irish Parliament).

Crowd assembling outside school before event. (Photo: D.Breatnach)

Jack Nalty was the last Irish and one of the last International Brigaders to fight and die in that war. The rest of the Brigaders, those not held as prisoners by Franco’s forces, were withdrawn soon afterwards as the indigenous anti-fascist forces fought on, losing against the Spanish military coupists with their German Nazi and Italian fascist allies.

Those commemorating Jack Nalty met at the St. Joseph’s Co-Educational School on the East Wall Road at 1pm on Sunday (23rd September) and included a cross-section of members of organisations and independent activists, socialists, republicans, communists and anarchists and other members of the local community. At the front entrance of the School a number of relatives of Jack Nalty held a banner along with a son of an Irish International Brigader and the crowd was addressed by Joe Mooney, of the East Wall History Group.

Joe Mooney speaking at start of event, relatives of International Brigaders beside him holding the banner in the colours of the Spanish Republic (Photo: D.Breatnach)

Mooney told the crowd that John Nalty came to the area at the age of six from Galway and on 31st August 1908 entered the East Wall National School on the Wharf Road. Just over thirty years later, 23rd September 1938, he would die on a Spanish battlefield, shot down in a hail of fascist bullets as he engaged in one last heroic act.

A member of the IRA during the War of Independence, Jack was a Republican, Socialist and trade unionist”, Mooney said, “representing 600 oil workers in Dublin Port. But in 1936 when the Spanish Civil War — or Anti-Fascist War as it should more accurately be called1 – began, he volunteered for the International Brigades to join the fight against European fascism. He was badly wounded and came back to Ireland, but would again go into action and was killed at the Battle of the Ebro. Having being among the first Irish volunteers to travel to Spain, he would die on their last day as they were preparing to withdraw from combat.

Nalty’s unit had been called to retreat when it was realisted that two machine-gunners had been left behind and he went back to collect them. On their retreat they were fired at and Jack Nalty was killed.

Section of crowd lined up in front of house where Jack Nalty had lived (Photo: D.Breatnach)

Mooney also asked those present to remember not only Jack Nalty but the ‘comradeship of heroes’ from Dublin’s Docklands and North Inner City – Dinny Coady, Tommy Wood and others.

The crowd then set off in a march led by a piper to East Road to unveil a memorial plaque. Across the road from Jack Nalty’s former house, the crowd paused to hear Diarmuid Breatnach sing a few verses of Christy Moore’s tribute to the Irish “Brigadistas”: “Viva La Quinze Brigada”.2

UNVEILING THE PLAQUE

Joe Mooney unveiling the plaque not far from Jack Nalty’s former house (Photo: D.Breatnach)

The plaque (text difficult to read in photograph)
(Photo: D.Breatnach)

The plaque could not be attached to Jack Nalty’s house and was affixed a little further down the road. Joe Mooney siad a few words there and introduced James Nugent who gave a speech he had prepared and the plaque was unveiled. Nugent concluded by saying that “the history of the past helps us to understand the present and to create the future.”

Kate Nugent read a message from the daughters of Steve Nugent (sadly died 2017) who researched the story of his uncle Jack and Mary Murphy read a short post from Vicky Booth (granddaughter of Syd Booth, who was with Jack when he died).

(Photo: D.Breatnach)

Piper plays lament by plaque
(Photo: D.Breatnach)

Harry Owens gave a short tribute speech on behalf of Friends of the International Brigades and Manus O’Riordan, son of Irish communist and International Brigade Volunteer, sang the chorus of Amhrán na bhFiann (“The Soldiers’ Song”, Irish national anthem) and the Internationale.

Section of crowd a location of the plaque (Photo: D.Breatnach)

At the unveiling ceremony (Photo: D.Breatnach)

Also at the unveiling ceremony
(Photo: D.Breatnach)

Joe Mooney acknowledged the presence of elected representatives Mary Lou McDonald, Sean Crowe and Cieran Perry and asked people to march to the nearby Sean O’Casey Centre to see the art exhibition and see two short films.

 

Marching from the plaque site, heading for the SO’C Centre
(Photo: D.Breatnach)(Photo: D.Breatnach)

Section of the attendance relaxing at the Sean O’Casey Centre between the plaque event and the films to be shown, also examining the art exhibition [see photos at end of post]

Back at the Sean O’Casey Community Centre, two short films were shown. One was a school project film in which a descendant of Jack Nalty interviews the latter’s nephew about his famous uncle. The second was dramatic film in which a Spanish trumpet player joins the fight against the fascist military uprising by Franco and other generals and features also actors playing two Irish International Brigaders, O’Connor and Charlie Donnelly3. When the former trumpet player is shot he sees into the future ….

Eddie O’Neill talked about the pulling out of the International Brigades in October 1938 in a bid to have the “non-interventionist” Western democracies put pressure on Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy to have them withdraw too, which did not happen. They marched through Barcelona on 17th October and were addressed in an emotional rally by La Pasionara4 and Eddie asked Nerea Fernández Cordero to read an English translation.

Nerea on stage just after reading translation of La Pasionara’s farewell to the Brigaders
(Photo: D.Breatnach)

Eddie O’Neill at the SO’C Centre with concluding speech: “We can’t afford to forget.”
(Photo: D.Breatnach)

Nerea told the audience that she is from Extremadura (a province of the Spanish state next to the Border with Portugal) and her grandfather, Antonio Fernández had fought against Franco, been captured, escaped to the mountains but was in time recaptured. Upon his release he had married Nerea’s grandmother and lived a peaceful life. Nerea said that she was proud of her grandfather and those who fought Franco and that “ we know La Pasionara’s speech in Spanish by memory.”

Reading of translation of La Pasionara’s speech to English from Youtube:

At the event the newly published pamphlet “In Pursuit of an Ideal – from East Wall to the Ebroabout Jack Nalty was made available for the first time and copies are available from the organisers.

Eddie O’Neill recalled being in the Spanish state with a group from Friends of the International Brigades to commemorate those who fought against Franco during that war and afterwards searching for an appropriate pub in which to socialise. They found a pub with a Guinness sign and went there which however turned out to be one of the most fascist pubs in the area but undeterred, they continued to celebrate the memory of the antifascist fighters there. A lone man in suit and tie asked people as they passed him to use the toilet why they were commemorating people who had died so long ago but when they explained he said he could not understand English.

We can’t afford to forget,” O’Neill told his audience, “least of all when the forces of fascism are gathering again.”

To conclude the event O’Neill called on Diarmuid Breatnach who sang the whole of Christy Moore’s “Viva La Quinze Brigada”, calling on the audience to join him in the chorus, remembering those who fought and gave their lives in the struggle against fascism.

Eddie O’Neill close at right of photo at unveiling ceremony
(Photo: D.Breatnach)

AN ANNUAL EVENT?

The organisers are reputedly considering making this an annual event – it is to be hoped that they do so.

Another section of the crowd at the plaque unveiling.
(Photo: D.Breatnach)

Also at the plaque unveiling ceremony
(Photo: D.Breatnach)

POSTCRIPT: JACK NALTY – ATHLETE COMPETING FOR IRELAND

In publicity prior to the event, the East Wall History group posted the following:
“In addition to his political and trade union activity, Jack Nalty was also a busy athlete, a regular competitor and medal winner with the Dublin Harriers. In 1931 he represented his country at the International Cross Country Championship, held at Baldoyle. Fellow competitor Tim Smyth became the first Irishman to win this competition.

(The full Irish Group for the event held on 22nd March 1931 is listed as: Frank Mills, J. Behan, John Nalty, J.C. McIntyre, John Timmins, T. King, T. O’Reilly, Thomas Kinsella, Tim Smythe).

This British Pathe footage shows the runners in action. Somewhere in the group is John (Jack) Nalty, East Wall resident, Republican and hero of the International Brigades. (The Pathe footage is viewable on post on the East Wall History Group event — CS)

Ironically, the same year as the competition the future leader of Irish Fascism, General Eoin O’Duffy had become the President of the National Athletic and Cycling Association (NACA) , and apparently was an admirer of Jack Nalty as an athlete!”

(Photo: D.Breatnach)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FOOTNOTES

 

1Basques in the provinces of Bizkaia, Guipuzkoa and Alava say it was not a civil war there, i.e between different sections of Basque society — the fascist forces came from outside.  In the fourth southern Basque province of Nafarroa, where the Carlists took control, they wiped out around 2,000 antifascists but it was hardly a war. The Catalans also say that the fascist forces invaded them and that it was not a civil war but an antifascist one. In some other places in the Spanish state many also say that the presence of Nazi German and Fascist Italian military in such numbers invalidated the term “civil war”.

2Also known as “Viva La Quinta Brigada”, which is however also the title of a different song from the Anti-Fascist War. Both titles are correct for this song since the Irish were in the Fifth of the International Brigades but when added to the ten indigenous Brigades (Spanish, Basque, Catalan etc), that became the Fifteenth. Wikipedia quotes authors to report an estimate that “during the entire war, between 32,000 and 35,000 members served in the International Brigades, including 15,000 who died in combat; however, there were never more than 20,000 brigade members present on the front line at one time.”

3Charlie Donnelly was a poet and member of the Republican Congress. He went to Spain to fight against Franco, where he died in February of 1937 at the Battle of Jarama. He is also one of those 19 names mentioned in Christy Moore’s song (“Viva La Quinta Brigada” or “Viva La Quinze Brigada”).

4Isidora Dolores Ibárruri Gómez (9 December 1895 – 12 November 1989), born and brought up in the Basque Country to a Basque mother and Spanish father, founder-member of the Spanish Communist Party and known for her political writing and speeches. She wrote an article when quite young under the pen-name “La Pasionara” (the Passion Flower) and was known by that nickname throughout her life.

Advertisements

GUERRA, DIVISIÓN Y PLANIFICAR LA INSURRECCIÓN

Diarmuid Breatnach

 

El 5 de agosto de 1914, el Consejo Supremo de la IRB1, un mes después de que los británicos declararon la guerra a Alemania, decidió en principio instigar un alzamiento por la independencia de Irlanda.

El 5 de agosto de 1914, un mes después de que los británicos declararon la guerra, el Consejo Supremo de la Hermandad Republicana Irlandesa2 decidió en principio liderar un levantamiento. Ellos imaginaron, como muchos observadores hicieron también, que la Guerra no duraría mucho y armarse y prepararse para una insurrección sería difícil dentro de ese marco de tiempo. La Guerra continuó mucho más allá del período esperado de un año, proporcionó al IRB el espacio para organizar, planificar y preparar, y también con un aliado para armarlos: Alemania.

La división en los Voluntarios Irlandeses causada por el discurso de Redmond3 en Woodenbridge, ofreciendo los Voluntarios al imperialismo británico para la guerra contra el imperialismo alemán y Turquía, dejó a la Hermandad Republicana Irlandesa secreta en una posición para tomar el control del resto, aquellos que declinaron luchar por Gran Bretaña y, en cambio, decidieron luchar por la independencia de Irlanda. Durante varios meses, Patrick Pearse se convirtió en Director de la Organización Militar, Bulmer Hobson Intendente General, Joseph Plunkett se convirtió en Director de Operaciones Militares, Éamonn Ceannt, Director de Comunicaciones, mientras que Thomas MacDonagh se convirtió en Director de Capacitación.

El académico del gaélico Eoin Mac Neill, jefe titular de los voluntarios irlandeses antes y después de la división de 1914. Más tarde sería deshonrado a los ojos de muchos por su cancelación pública del Levantamiento de 1916 que siguió sin él pero muy disminuido en número.
(imagen originada: Internet)

Bulmer Hobson en años posteriores. En 1916 se había separado del IRB que había ayudado a reorganizar e incluso fue puesto bajo detención armada por un período por el IRB. (Imagen originada: Internet)

El jefe titular de los Voluntarios, el erudito del gaélico Eoin Mac Neil, y figuras fundadoras como El O’Rahilly, mientras ocupaban puestos prominentes y se negaban a seguir a Redmond, no incorporaban la misma coherencia y determinación para la insurrección que encarnaba el IRB.

Patrick Pearse
(Imagen originada: Internet)

Esa lista de puestos de oficiales de IRB dentro de los Voluntarios contiene cuatro de los posteriores siete signatarios de la Proclamación de 19164. Que no aparecen los nombres de Seán Mac Diarmada y Thomas Clarke, aunque son figuras centrales en la reorganización del IRB en años anteriores, no es sorprendente: el Fenian mayor, veterano de 15 años en la cárcel británica en condiciones que, se dice, envió un tercio de sus camaradas locos y otro tercio a tumbas tempranas, prefirió trabajar en las sombras. Sin duda había instruido a su estudiante y enérgico organizador, Mac Diarmada, a hacer lo mismo en la medida de lo posible. Sin embargo, ellos también se unieron al ampliado Consejo Militar a fines de 1915.

Thomas Clarke, ex preso Fenian y el verdadero jefe de la IRB en Irlanda. (Imagen originada: Internet)

Seán Mac Diarmada, reclutado al IRB originalmente por Hobson se convirtió en colaborador cercano con Clarke. (Imagen originado: internet)

El quinto de los signatarios de la Proclamación que falta es James Connolly5, quien en agosto de 1914 se estaba recuperando y reconstruyendo el Sindicato de Transporte y Trabajadores Generales de Irlanda, meses después del final de la agotadora lucha de 8 meses contra el patronal de Dublín6. Pero estaba horrorizado por la guerra imperialista y el enfrentamiento de los trabajadores entre sí, dividido por las clases dominantes de sus respectivas ubicaciones, vestidos en uniformes de diferentes colores que ocultaban sus intereses comunes. Connolly quería un levantamiento, no solo por la independencia, sino también contra la próxima carnicería de la guerra. La reorganización del Ejército Ciudadano Irlandés, la milicia de la defensa obrera, comenzó a comprometer las energías de Connolly, pero el solamente tomó el juramento del IRB en enero de 1916, tres meses antes del Alzamiento.

James Connolly, foto tomada en 1900. (Imagen originada: Internet)

Tantos hilos diferentes de la vida irlandesa – cultural, política, de clase y de nación – se habían unido para tejer un tapiz que se leería de diferentes maneras durante décadas pero que aún tendría poderosos imágenes, colores y palabras para mover a mujeres y hombres un siglo después.

Fin.

Notas a pie de página

1Irish Republican Brotherhood, organización revolucionaria republicana secreta. Además de en Irlanda, tenía grande representación in Gran Bretaña y en los EEUU.

2La misma organización y a veces llamada La Hermandad Fenian.

3John Redmond, jefe del Partido Nacionalista de Irlanda, cual poco antes había obligado a los Voluntarios aceptar sus nominados en el Ejecutivo.

4Patrick Pearse, Joseph Plunkett, Thomas Mac Donagh y Éamonn Ceannt.

5Revolucionario comunista y republicano, criado en la diáspora irlandesa en Edimburgo.

6El Cierre Patronal de Dublín del 1913, que también había comenzado en el agosto.

AGUANTAR Y REÍR — PERO REVOLUCIÓN!

Diarmuid Breatnach

 

Estuve recientemente leyendo sobre el apoyo en Cataluña a la lucha para la independencia de Irlanda en el 1920, inspirado especialmente por la huelga de hambre del Traolach Mac Suibhne (Terence McSwiney), Gran Alcade de Cork y oficial del grupo armado republicano el IRA.  Sabemos también que las huelgas de hambre de parte de presos republicanos irlandeses en el Long Kesh en el 1981, simbolizadas en el personaje del Bobby Sands, también habían impresionados a gente por todo el mundo.

Me encanta leer de las conexiones de la lucha del independismo irlandés con las luchas de resistencia de otros pueblos. El Alzamiento de 1916 en Dublín y la Guerra de la Independencia por todo Irlanda dio inspiración a nacionalistas, republicanos y socialistas revolucionarios por grandes partes del Mundo, influyendo al vietnames Ho Chi Minh, a Nehru (y a Indios mas revolucionarios que el) y a gente en todas las colonias de los estados coloniales como la Gran Bretaña, Francia, España, Portugal, Bélgica, Holanda, Alemania ….. Llegó a tener impacto en cada continente del mundo menos en el de Antartica. Y que lástima que terminó en tan vergüenza sórdida!

Me gustaría comentar sobre la frase del McSwiney “no es él quien puede infligir más, sino quién puede soportar más que vencerá”. Y al mismo tiempo referir a la de otro huelguista de hambre hasta la muerte, 61 años después de la muerte del McSwiney: “Nuestra venganza será la risa de nuestros niños.”

Esas frases de los mártires McSwiney y Sands son interesantes pero hay que leer los en el contexto de sus vidas y de la lucha para la independencia de Irlanda. Demasiadas veces son esas palabras apropiadas por pacifistas o peor, para los que quieren rendir o diluir o desviar la resistencia.

Foto del Traolach Mac Suibhne (Terence McSwiney)
(Fuente de foto: el Internet)

Las historias de ambos hombres lo dejan claro que se habían comprometido a lucha armada contra el imperio británico, McSwiney en el IRA y Sands en el Provisional IRA. Los dos se consideraban soldados de la resistencia nacionalista o republicana. Si no hubieron muertos en la cárcel, estarían por ahí pegando tiros a la policía colonial y al Ejercitó Británico, tratando de matar les y tratando de evitar que les maten a ellos.

La lucha para la independencia de Irlanda 1916-1921 quedó en gran parte derrumbada, tras el Trato de 1921 y la Guerra Civil del 1922-1923. El nuevo Estado Irlandés fusiló a 81 republicanos durante esos últimos años y mató al rededor de 120 ejecutados tras haber les hecho preso en lucha, o secuestrados y asesinados. Muchos tuvieron que huir del país.

Se volvió a lucha en seria en el 1971, pero esta vez casi totalmente confinada a la quinta parte del país, la colonia británica de Los Seis Condados. Y claro, quedó sin éxito, a pesar de enorme bravura y sacrificio por el pueblo a través de casi tres décadas.

Bobby Sands, foto tomado durante su encarcelamiento.
(Fuente de la foto: el Internet)

A los que les dan miedo o les disgusta la resistencia armada, les gustan muchísimo esas frases de Sands y de McSwiney, sacadas de sus contextos.

Guste o no guste, la historia nos repite a enseñar que la resistencia a las fuerzas del imperialismo (y aún, del capitalismo), si va a tener éxito, tiene que pasar a la fase armada en algún momento. Y no es por que les guste la violencia a los de la resistencia si no por que el enemigo no le dará ningún otro remedio. Vendrá con armas, juicios, cárcel para aplastar la resistencia. Así que la única cuestión no es a ver si la resistencia exitosa aquí o ahí le hace falta pasar a la fase armada, si no cual es el momento en que se necesita hacer. Eso es lo que nos dice la historia, creemos lo que nos guste.

THREE STATE MURDERS IN DUBLIN CITY

Reprinted with permission from the Facebook site of Dublin Political History Tours 

ON THE 25th OF AUGUST 1922, THREE IRISH REPUBLICANS WERE ABDUCTED IN DUBLIN CITY BY IRISH FREE STATE FORCES AND MURDERED. AT LEAST ONE OF THEM WAS A TEENAGER.

EN EL 25 DE AGOSTO 1922, TRES REPUBLICANOS FUERON SECUESTRADOS EN LA CIUDAD DE DUBLIN POR FUERZAS DEL NUEVO “FREE STATE” Y ASESINADOS.  (miren de bajo para traducción del artículo al castellano) 

The signing of the Treaty offered by the British in 1921 after three years of Irish guerrilla war and civil disobedience against British repression and its terror campaign, not only partitioned the country but split the alliance of forces that had constituted the Republican movement until that point (quite a few were, in truth, more nationalist than Republican).

A majority of the elected parliamentary representatives voted to accept the Treaty terms. However a majority of the male fighters rejected it, as did almost unanimously the Republican women’s auxiliary organisation Cumann na mBan and the Republican youth organisation, na Fianna Éireann. The remnants of the Irish Citizen Army, male and female, were likewise mostly opposed to it.

In 1922 civil war broke out after the IRA firstly occupied and fortified the Four Courts buildings and secondly after Michael Collins ordered the artillery bombardment of those and other buildings in the Dublin city centre occupied by the Republicans.

Oriel House

Oriel House (photo taken in the past), HQ of the Free State police and of the CID; torture was carried out here and murder gangs went from here to executed Republicans.

Both sides of course shot soldiers on the other side but the Free State Forces soon became known for atrocities, including the shooting of unarmed prisoners and instituting a reign of terror in some areas under their control. The State also carried out martial law executions of captured Volunteers (83 over less than 12 months). Free State forces, in particular the Criminal Investigations Department of the police force and some Army units also became known for abductions of people and their subsequent torture and murder. The activities of the CID based in Oriel House in Westland Row soon made the building a feared one.

Sean Cole & Alfred Colley murdered 1923

Bodies of the murdered Fianna Éireann officers, laid out for honouring prior to funeral. (Source: Internet)

THE THREE MURDERS

On the 25th August Alfie (Leo) Colley (19 or 21 according to different reports), Parnell Street, and Sean Cole (17 or 18 according to different reports), Buckingham Street, two streets in the north Dublin city centre, were picked up at Newcomen Bridge (one report has Annesley Bridge), North Strand on their way home from a meeting of officers at Marino. Colley was a tinsmith and Cole was an electrician and they were also two of the most senior officers in the Dublin Brigade of Na Fianna Éireann.

According to a statement by an eyewitness, their abductors were wearing trench coats over Free State Army officers’ uniforms (this was reproduced in a cartoon drawn by Constance Markievicz and widely distributed). Other witnesses saw them being shot dead at ‘The Thatch’, Puck’s Lane, (now Yellow Road), Whitehall, Dublin. The Irish Independent reported the murders but mentioned only the trench coats, without reference to Free State Army uniforms under them, which could leave readers to form the impression that the killers were IRA.

Apparently it was an opinion of many at the time was that their killing were a reprisal for the killing of Michael Collins earlier that week in Cork (despite General Mulcahy’s call for no acts of revenge to be taken).

Markievicz Cartoon Murder Gang Cole & Colley

Cartoon by Constance Markievicz depicting the State murder gang of Volunteers Cole and Colley. (Source: Come Here To Me blog)

On the same day, Volunteer Bernard Daly, a lieutenant in the IRA and commanding officer of Z Company, Dublin Brigade, was taken by armed men in plain clothes from Hogan’s pub (now O’Neill’s), where he was employed at Suffolk Street in the south city centre. His body was found later that day in a ditch on the Malahide Road, Belcamp with three bullet wounds to the chest and two the head. The Independent reported that the men coming for him told another barman that they had a warrant for Daly’s arrest, pointed a gun at him and threatened to shoot him if he obstructed them in any way. They took Daly to the cellar, searched him and then forced him to their car across the road.

The Independent also reported that Daly was a native of Old Hill, Drogheda; although he had relatives there and was engaged to be married to local girl there too, it seems he actually came from Carrikaldrene, Mullaghbawn, Co. Armagh. He had been active in the War of Independence, had been captured, tortured and jailed for over a year by the British – but it was the Irish Free State that murdered him.

 

Links for sources and more information/ enlaces para mas información:

https://comeheretome.com/2016/11/21/colley-cole-and-murder-at-yellow-road/

http://www.independent.ie/regionals/droghedaindependent/lifestyle/drogheda-man-is-one-of-three-shot-27162379.html

http://www.anphoblacht.com/contents/15707

TRADUCCIÓN AL CASTELLANO

La firma del Tratado ofrecido por los británicos en el 1921 después de tres años de guerra guerrillera irlandesa y desobediencia civil contra la represión británica y su campaña de terror, no sólo dividió el país, sino que dividió la alianza de fuerzas que había constituido el movimiento republicano hasta ese momento. (Bastantes fueron, en verdad, más nacionalistas que republicanos).

La mayoría de los representantes parlamentarios electos votaron a favor de aceptar los términos del Tratado. Sin embargo, la mayoría de los combatientes hombres la rechazaron, al igual que casi unánimemente la organización de mujeres auxiliares republicanas Cumann na mBan y la organización republicana de la juventud, na Fianna Éireann. Los restos del Ejército Ciudadano Irlandes, entre hombres y mujeres, también se oponían en su mayor parte.

En 1922 la guerra civil estalló después de que el IRA primero ocupó y fortificó los edificios de los Cuatro Tribunales en Dublín y en segundo lugar cuando Michael Collins ordenó el bombardeo por artillería de ésos y de otros edificios ocupados por los republicanos en el centro de la ciudad.

Ambos bandos, por supuesto, dispararon contra soldados en el otro lado, pero las Fuerzas del Estado Libre pronto se hicieron conocidas por atrocidades, incluyendo el tiroteo de prisioneros desarmados e instituyendo un reinado de terror en algunas áreas bajo su control. También llevaron a cabo ejecuciones de la ley marcial de Voluntarios capturados (83 en menos de 12 meses). Las fuerzas del Estado Libre, en particular el Departamento de Investigaciones Criminales de la policía y algunas unidades del Ejército también se conocieron por secuestros de personas y su posterior tortura y asesinato. Las actividades de la CID con sede en Oriel House en Westland Row pronto hizo el edificio uno para dar temor.

 

LOS TRES ASESINATOS

El 25 de agosto fueron recogidos Alfie (Leo) Colley (19 o 21 anos de acuerdo a informes diferentes), de Parnell Street, y Sean Cole (17 o 18 según informes diferentes), de Buckingham Street, dos calles en el centro norte de la ciudad de Dublín, en Newcomen Bridge (un informe tiene Annesley Bridge), North Strand en su camino a casa de una reunión de oficiales en Marino. Colley era un hojalatero y Cole era electricista y también eran dos de los oficiales más altos de la Brigada de Dublín de Na Fianna Éireann.

Según una declaración de un testigo ocular, sus secuestradores llevaban abrigos sobre los uniformes de oficiales del Ejército del Estado Libre (esto fue reproducido en un dibujo hecho por Constance Markievicz y ampliamente distribuido). Otros testigos vieron que fueron muertos a tiros cerca de la taberna “The Thatch“, Puck’s Lane, (ahora Yellow Road), Whitehall, Dublín. El periódico Irish Independent informó de los asesinatos y sobre los abrigos de trinchera lo que podría dejar a los lectores a dar la impresión de que los asesinos eran del IRA, pero no mencionó los uniformes del Ejército del Estado Libre de bajo de los abrigos.

Aparentemente, la opinión de muchos era que sus asesinatos eran una represalia por la muerte de Michael Collins a principios de esa semana en Cork (a pesar del pedido del General Mulcahy de que no se tomaran actos de venganza).  Pero los secuestros y asesinatos continuaron, incluso para unos meses después del fin de la Guerra.

El mismo día del secuestro de los voluntarios Cole y Colley, el voluntario Bernard Daly, un teniente en el IRA y comandante de la Compañía Z, Brigada de Dublín, fue llevado por hombres armados vestidos de paisano de Hogan’s pub (ahora O’Neill’s), donde trabajaba en Suffolk Street en el centro sur de la ciudad. Su cuerpo fue encontrado más tarde ese día en una zanja en el Malahide Road, Belcamp con tres heridas de bala en el pecho y dos en la cabeza. El periódico The Irish Independent informó que los hombres que iban a por él le dijeron a otro asistente del bar que tenían una orden de arresto de Daly, le apuntaron con una pistola y amenazaron con dispararle si lo obstruía de alguna manera. Llevaron a Daly al sótano, lo registraron y lo obligaron a ir a su auto al otro lado de la carretera.

El Independent también informó que Daly era un nativo de Old Hill, Drogheda, pero aunque tenía parientes allí y estaba comprometido para casarse con una chica local allí también, parece que realmente vino de Carrikaldrene, Mullaghbawn, Co. Armagh. Había sido activo en la Guerra de la Independencia, había sido capturado, torturado y encarcelado por más de un año por los británicos, pero fue el Estado Libre Irlandés quien lo asesinó.

31st AUGUST 102 YEARS AGO — BLOODY SUNDAY IN DUBLIN 1913/ HOY, HACE 102 ANOS — EL DOMINGO SANGRIENTO DEL 31 DE AGOSTO 1913

Diarmuid Breatnach (published originally in Dublin Political History Tours)

(Miren de bajo para la versión en castellano).

The 31st of August 1913 was one of several ‘Bloody Sundays’ in Irish history and it took place in O’Connell Street (then Sackville Street).

A rally had been called to hear the leader of the IT&GWU) speak. The rally had been prohibited by a judge but the leader, Jim Larkin, burning the prohibition order in front of a big demonstration of workers on the evening of the 29th, promised to attend and address the public.

On the day in O’Connell Street, the Dublin police with their batons attacked the crowd, including many curious bystanders and passers by, wounding many by which at least one died later from his injuries.

One could say that on that street on the 31st, or in the nearby Eden Quay on the night of the 30th, when the police batoned to death two workers, was born the workers’ militia, the Irish Citizen Army, in a desire that very soon would be made flesh.

La carga policial contra los manifestantes y transeúntes en la Calle O'Connell en el 31 Agosto 1913/ DMP attack on demonstrators and passers-by on 31st August 1913 in Dublin's O'Connell Street

La carga policial contra los manifestantes y transeúntes en la Calle O’Connell en el 31 Agosto 1913/ DMP attack on demonstrators and passers-by on 31st August 1913 in Dublin’s O’Connell Street

THE EMPLOYERS’ LOCKOUT

Bloody Sunday Dublin occurred during the employers’ Lockout of 1913. Under Jim Larkin’s leadership, the Liverpudlian of the Irish diaspora, the young ITGWU was going from strength to strength and increasing in membership, with successful strikes and representation in Dublin firms. But in July 1913, one of Dublin’s foremost businessmen, William Martin Murphy, called 200 businessmen to a meeting, where they resolved to break the trade union.

Murphy was an Irish nationalist, of the political line that wished for autonomy within the British Empire; among his businesses were the Dublin tram company, the Imperial Hotel in O’Connell Street and the national daily newspaper “The Irish Independent”.

The employers decided to present all their workers with a declaration to sign that the workers would not be part of the ITGWU, nor would they support them in any action; in the case of refusal to sign, they would be sacked.

The members of the ITGWU would have to reject the document or leave the union, which nearly none of them were willing to do.

Nor could the other unions accept that condition, despite any differences they may have had with Larkin, with his ideology and his tactics, because at some point in the future the employers could use the same tactic against their own members.

The Dublin (and Wexford) workers rejected the ultimatum and on the 26th began a tram strike, which was followed by the Lockout and mixed with other strikes — a struggle that lasted for eight months.

Dublin had remarkable poverty, with infectious diseases such as tuberculosis and others, including the sexually-transmitted ones, the city being a merchant port and also having many British Army barracks. The percentage of infantile mortality was higher than that in Calcutta. Workers’ housing was in terrible condition, often with entire families living in one room, in houses sometimes of 12 rooms, each one full of people, with one or two toilets in the outside yard.

In those conditions, 2,000 Dublin workers confronted their employers, the latter aided by their Metropolitan Police, the Irish colonial police and the British Army. As well as the workers, many small traders suffered, those selling in the street or from little shops.

On that Monday, the 31st of September 1913, some trade unionists and curious people congregated in Dublin’s main street, then called Sackville Street, in front of and around the main door of the big Clery’s shop. In the floors above the shop, was the Imperial Hotel, with a restaurant.

The main part of the union went that day to their grounds in Fairview, to avoid presenting the opportunity for another confrontation with the Dublin Municipal Police. Others in the leadership had argued that the police should not be given the opportunity and that there would be many other confrontations during the Lockout. But Larkin swore that he would attend and that a judge should not be permitted to ban a workers’ rally.
Daily Mirror Arrest Larkin photoThere were many police but nothing was happening and Larkin did not appear. After a while, a horse-drawn carriage drove up and an elderly church minister alighted, assisted by a woman, and entered the shop. They took the lift to the restaurant floor. A little later Larkin appeared at the restaurant open window, in church minister’s clothing, spoke a few words to the crowd and ran inside. Those in the street were very excited and when the police took Larkin out under arrest, they cheered him, urged on by Constance Markievicz. The police drew their batons and attacked the crowd — any man not wearing a police uniform.

 

THE UNION’S ARMY

The Irish Citizen Army was founded for the union on the 6th November 1913 by Larkin, Connolly and others with Seán Ó Cathasaigh/ O’Casey, playwright and author, including the first history of the organisation.

The Citizen Army at Croydon House, at the ITGWU's grounds in Fairview/ El Ejercito Ciudadano en su parte del parque en Fairview.

The Citizen Army at Croydon House, at the ITGWU’s grounds in Fairview/ El Ejercito Ciudadano en su parte del parque en Fairview.

As distinct from the Irish Volunteers, women could enter the ICA, within which they had equal rights.

Funeral of James Byrne, who died as a result of his imprisonment during the 1913 Lockout

Funeral of James Byrne, who died as a result of his imprisonment during the 1913 Lockout/ Procesión funébre de James Byrne, fallecido por razón de su encarcelamiento durante el Cierre de 1913, pasando por el muelle sur Eden’s Quay, partiendo de la Salla de la Libertad.

It was reorganised in 1914 as the union was recovering from its defeat during the Lockout, and 200 fought alongside the Volunteers in the 1916 Easter Rising, after which two of its leaders, Michael Mallin and James Connolly, were executed. Among the nearly 100 death sentences there were others of the ICA, including Markievicz, but their death sentences were commuted (14 were executed in Dublin, one in Cork and one was hanged in London).

The main fighting locations of the ICA in 1916 were in Stephen’s Green and in the Royal College of Surgeons, in City Hall and, with Volunteers in the GPO and in the terrace in Moore Street, the street market.

The Imperial Hotel on the other side of the street from the GPO was occupied too by the ICA and on top of it they attached their new flag, the “Starry Plough/ Plough and Stars”, the design in gold colour on a green background, the

The flag of the ICA, flown over Murphy's Imperial Hotel in 1916

The flag of the ICA, flown over Murphy’s Imperial Hotel in 1916

constellation of Ursa Mayor, which the Irish perceived in the form of a plough, an instrument of work. And there the flag still flew after the Rising, having survived the bombardment and the fire which together destroyed the building and all others up to the GPO, on both sides of the street. Then a British officer happened to notice the flag and ordered a soldier to climb up and take it down — we know not where it went.

 

TODAY

Today, after various amalgamations, the once-noble ITGWU has become SIPTU, the largest trade union in Ireland but one which does not fight. The skyscraper containing its offices, Liberty hall, occupies the spot of the original Liberty Hall, prior to its destruction by British bombardment in 1916.

The Irish newspaper the “Irish Independent” continues to exist, known as quite right-wing in its editorial line. Murphy’s trams came to an end during the 1950 decade and those in Dublin today have nothing to do with Murphy.

The Imperial Hotel no longer exists and, until very recently, Clery had taken over the whole building, but they sacked their workers and closed the building, saying that they were losing money.

In front of the building, in the pedestrianised central reservation, stands the monument as a representation of Jim Larkin. The form of the statue, with its hands in the air, is from a photo taken of Larkin during the Lockout, as he addressed another rally in the same street. It is said that in those moments, he was finishing a quotation which he used during that struggle (but which had also been written previously by James Connolly in 1897, and which something similar had been written by the liberal monarchist Étienne de La Boétie [1530–1563] and later by the French republican revolutionary Camille Desmoulins [1760–1794]): “The great appear great because we are on our knees – LET US ARISE!”

 

The Jim Larkin monument in O'Connell Street today/ El monumento de Jim Larkin in la Calle O'Connell hoy en día

The Jim Larkin monument in O’Connell Street today/ El monumento de Jim Larkin in la Calle O’Connell hoy en día

 

EL 31 DE AGOSTO EN El 1913 FUE UNO DE LOS DOMINGOS SANGRIENTOS DE IRLANDA Y OCURRIÓ EN LA CALLE PRINCIPAL DE DUBLÍN.

Hubo una concentración para escuchar al líder del sindicato de Trabajadores de Transporte y de General de Irlanda (IT&GWU) hablar. La manifestación fue prohibida por juez pero el líder, Jim Larkin, quemando el documento de prohibición en frente de manifestación grande la noche del 29, prometió que iba a asistir y hablar al publico.

El día 31 en la Calle O’Connell, la policía de Dublin con sus porras atacaron la concentración y a muchos otros curiosos o pasando por casualidad, hiriendo a muchos por lo cual murió uno por lo menos mas tarde de sus heridas.

Se puede decir que en esa calle en el 31, o en la cerca muelle, Eden Quay, la noche del 30, cuando mataron a porras dos trabajadores, se dio luz a la milicia sindical, el Ejercito Ciudadano de Irlanda, en deseo que poco mas tarde estaría fundado en actualidad.

EL CIERRE PATRONAL

El Domingo Sangriento ocurrió durante el Cierre Patronal de Dublín en el 1913. Bajo el liderazgo de Jim Larkin, el Liverpoolés de diáspora Irlandesa, el joven sindicato ITGWU fue yendo de fuerza a fuerza y aumentando en miembros, con éxitos en sus huelgas y reconocido en muchas de las empresas de Dublín. Pero en Julio del 1913, uno de los principales empresarios de Dublín, William Martin Murphy, llamó a 200 de los empresarios a mitin y resolvieron romper el sindicato.

Murphy era nacionalista Irlandés, de la linea de pedir autonomía pero adentro del Imperio británico; entre sus empresas le pertenecía la linea de tranvías de Dublín, el Hotel Imperial en la Calle O’Connell y el periódico diario nacional The Irish Independent.

Resolvieron los empresarios presentar a todos sus trabajadores una declaración para firmar que no serían parte del sindicato ITGWU ni les darían ningún apoyo en cualquiera acción; en caso de negar firmar, se les despedirían.

Los miembros del ITGWU tendrían que rechazar el documento o salir del sindicato, lo cual casi lo total no estuvieron dispuestos hacer.

Los otros sindicatos, pese a cualquiera diferencias tuvieron con Larkin, con sus pensamientos y sus tácticas, tampoco podían acceder a esa condición por que mas tarde se podría usar la misma táctica en contra de sus miembros también.

Los trabajadores de Dublín (y de Wexford) rechazaron el ultimátum y empezaron el 26 de Agosto una huelga de los tranvías, seguido por el Cierre Patronal, mixta con otras huelgas, una lucha que duró ocho meses en total.

Dublín tuvo una pobreza impresionante, con infecciones de tuberculosis y otras, incluido las transmitidas por el sexo, siendo puerto mercantil y teniendo muchos cuarteles del ejercito británico. El porcentaje de la mortalidad infantil era mas de la de la ciudad de Calcuta. Las viviendas de los trabajadores estaban en terribles condiciones, con a menudo familias grandes enteras viviendo en una habitación, en casas a veces de 12 habitaciones, cada uno llena de gente, con una o dos servicios en el patio exterior.

En esas condiciones 2,000 trabajadores de Dublín se enfrentaron al patronal de Dublín, con su policía metropolitana, la policía colonial de Irlanda y el ejercito británico. Además de los trabajadores, muchos pequeños empresarios, vendiendo en la calle o en tiendas pequeños, sufrieron.

Ese Domingo, del 31o de Setiembre 1913, algunos sindicalistas y gente curiosa se congregaron en la calle principal de Dublín, entonces nombrado Sackville Street, en frente y al rededor de la puerta principal de la gran tienda de Clery. En las plantas después de la primera, estaba el Hotel Imperial, con un restaurante.

La mayor parte del sindicato se fueron ese día a una parte de parque que les pertenecía por la costa, para evitar otra enfrentamiento con la Policía Metropolitana de Dublín. Habían argumentado otros de la dirección del sindicato que no se debe dar les la oportunidad a la policía y que habría muchos otros enfrentamientos durante el Cierre. Pero Larkin juró que lo iba a asistir y que no se podía permitir a un juez prohibir manifestaciones obreras.

Había mucha policía pero nada pasaba y Larkin no aparecía. Después de un rato, un coche de caballos llegó y un viejo sacerdote salió, apoyado por una mujer, y entraron en la tienda de Clery. Subieron en el ascensor hacía el restaurante. Poco después, Larkin apareció en la ventana abierta del restaurante, en el traje del cura y habló unas palabras, antes de correr adentro. Los de abajo en la calle muy entusiasmados y cuando la policía salieron agarrando le a Larkin, la multitud le dieron vítores, alentados por Constance Markievicz. La Policía Municipal sacaron sus porras y atacaron a la multitud – a cualquier hombre que no llevaba uniforme policial.

 

EL EJERCITO DEL SINDICATO

El Ejercito Ciudadano de Irlanda (Irish Citizen Army) fue fundado para el sindicato en el 6 de Noviembre del 1913 por Larkin, Connolly y otros con Seán Ó Cathasaigh/ O’Casey, escritor de obras para teatro y algunas otras, incluso la primera historia de la organización. A lo contrario de Los Voluntarios, el ICA permitía entrada a mujeres, donde tenían derechos iguales.

Fue reorganizada en 1914 cuando el sindicato se fue recobrando de la derrota del Cierre Patronal, y 200 lucharon con los Voluntarios en el Alzamiento de Pascuas de 1916, después de lo cual dos de sus líderes, Michael Mallin y James Connolly, fueron ejecutados. Entre los casi 100 condenas de muerte, habían otros del ICA, incluso Constance Markievicz, pero sus condenas de muerte fueron conmutadas (se les ejecutaron a 14 en Dublín y a uno en Cork, y a otro le ahorcaron en Londres).

Los lugares principales de lucha del ICA en 1916 fueron en el Stephen’s Green y en el Collegio Real de Cirujanos (Royal College of Surgeons), en el Ayuntamiento y, con Voluntarios, en la Principal Oficina de Correos (GPO) y en la manzana del Moore Street, el mercado callejero.

El Hotel Imperial al otro lado de la calle del GPO lo ocuparon también el ICA, y encima colocaron su nueva bandera, el Arado de Estrellas (“Starry Plough/ Plough and Stars”), el diseño en color oro sobre fondo verde, la formación celeste del Ursa Mayor, que lo veían los Irlandeses en forma del arado, una herramienta de trabajo. Y ahí ondeó la bandera después del Alzamiento, habiendo sobrevivido el bombardeo británico y el fuego que destruyeron el edificio y la calle entera hacía el GPO, en ambos lados. Entonces un oficial británico se dio cuenta de la bandera y le mandó a soldado hir a recoger la – no se sabe donde terminó.

 

HOY EN DÍA

Hoy en día, después de varias fusiones, el noble ITGWU se ha convertido en el SIPTU, el sindicato mas grande de Irlanda y parecido en su falta de lucha a Comisiones Obreras del Estado Español. El rasca cielos de sus oficinas, La Sala de la Liberta (Liberty Hall), ocupa el mismo lugar que ocupó la antigua Liberty Hall, antes de su destrucción por bombardeo británico en 1916.

El periódico Irish Independent sigue existiendo, conocido por ser bastante de derechas en su linea editorial. Los tranvías de Murphy terminaron en la década del 1950 y los de hoy en Dublín no tienen nada que ver con los de antes.

El Hotel Imperial ya no existe y, hasta hace muy poco, la empresa Clery lo tenía todo el edificio, pero despidieron a sus trabajadores y cerraron el edificio, diciendo que perdían dinero.

En frente del edificio, en la reserva peatonal del centro de la calle, está el monumento representando a Jim Larkin. La forma de la estatua, con las manos en el aire, lo tiene de foto que le hicieron durante el Cierre Patronal, cuando habló en otro manifestación en la misma calle. Dicen que en ese momento, estaba terminando una frase famosa que usó durante esa lucha (pero que también lo escribió Connolly antes en 1897, y que lo había escrito algo parecido primero el monárquico reformista Étienne de La Boétie [1530–1563] y luego el revolucionario republicano francés Camille Desmoulins [1760–1794]): “Los grandes aparecen grande por que estamos de rodillas – levantamanos!”

 

Fin

LA CAMPAŇA PARA DEFENDER LA MEMORIA HISTÓRICA DE LA CALLE MOORE EN DUBLIN

(Primero publicado (y editado por el editor, gracias) en el blog nortedeirlanda.blogspot.ie el martes, 20 de enero de 2015).

 

Diarmuid Breatnach

El callejero mercado de Moore Street en mejores anos, mirando des de la calle Henry Street hacia el norte y la calle Parnell. El hilero ocupado en 1916 comienza justo después del primer callejón a la derecha.

 Actualmente se está haciendo una fuerte campaňa para defender Moore Street (Sráid an Mhúraigh), el mercado callejero bien conocido de Dublín. No es solamente que esa calle es la única que sobrevive de un casco de mercado callejero con existencia desde el Siglo XVI y que hasta la mitad del siglo pasado consistía de tres calles paralelas conectadas por callejuelas. Es más que eso, pues una hilera de casas fue ocupada por entre 200 y 300 insurrectos durante el Alzamiento de Pascua en 1916 y fue desde ahí que se hizo la rendición. La hilera y el mercado callejero están amenazados por un plan del especulador Joe O’Reilly de construir otro centro comercial desde la Calle O’Connell a Moore Street.

Breve resumen de la historia de Dublín

Los vikingos construyeron la ciudad de Dublín alrededor del 841 en el lugar Dubh Linn (el Pozo Negro), al lado sur del río, antes ocupado por una colonia cristiana y ahí construyeron su puerto fortificado, sobre todo como base para su comercio de esclavos. El lugar del Pozo Negro se cree que estaba en una parte del Castillo de Dublin, pero con el río que lo alimentaba ahora bajo la tierra.  Los indígenas tenían un pueblo ya cerca donde las grandes vías al oeste y al sureste cruzaban el rio por un vado, su nombre era Baile Átha Cliath.

En el 1014, en una gran batalla por las orillas del rio Tulcha, al norte de la ciudad de entonces y ahora dentro de ella, el rey indígena Brian Boróimhe (Brian Boru en inglés) venció a una fuerza militar mixta de Vikingos de Dublín, de la Isla Man, de las Islas Orca y del rey indígena de Laighean (“Leinster” en el inglés).  Dublín permanecería después bajo mando vikingo pero el peligro de la dominación vikinga de Irlanda no surgió nunca mas.

Los Normandos, que ya habían vencido a los Vikingos y a los Sajones en 1066 en los reinos donde actualmente está Inglaterra, invadieron Irlanda en 1169, vencieron la resistencia indígena y se apropiaron de mucha parte del país.  Estos vencieron a los vikingos de Dublín en 1170 y les expulsaron a las afueras, a un lugar que hoy en día es un distrito en el norte de la ciudad.  En el mismo lugar del Pozo Negro, los Normandos construyeron su fortaleza, rodeada de su terreno con muro y empalizada y desde entonces hasta la creación del Estado Irlandés en 1922, el castillo en ese sitio ha sido el cuartel general de la ocupación británica en Irlanda.  El este y sur de Bretaňa, bajo dominación Normanda pero mas tarde con alianzas con jefes sajones, se convirtió en el poder inglés que unos siglos después se puede conocer como el de Gran Bretaña y por eso se cuenta la ocupación británica de Irlanda desde el aňo 1169.

El Alzamiento de Pascua de 1916 y Moore Street

Un mapa del centro de Dublín entre el GPO y el Rotunda, con edificios ocupados por los insurrectos (y otros relevantes edificios) en el 1916 marcados en rojo.

Pues aunque la ciudad de Dublín era una creación extraňa y permanecía bajo mando ocupante, y pese a que a veces se les prohibió entrada a indígenas bajo pena de muerte, y pese también a que en el siglo XIX se pensaba en la ciudad como la segunda del Imperio, a través de los aňos la resistencia a la ocupación contaba con apoyo en muchas partes de Dublín. Y en 1916, durante la Primera Guerra Mundial, 1,200 hombres y mujeres salieron a la calle en alzamiento contra el poder imperialista y colonial mas grande del mundo, con “un imperio donde el sol nunca se pone”.

La mayor parte de la insurrección fue llevada por la organización republicana y nacionalista The Irish Volunteers (Voluntarios de Irlanda), además de su grupo auxiliar femenino Cumann na mBan y el grupo juvenil Na Fianna Éireann.  La fuerza era la tercera parte de lo que habían contado los líderes del alzamiento, por razón del sabotaje por una parte del liderazgo de los Voluntarios.

Una parte de la fuerza militar insurrecta con orígenes diferentes era el Irish Citizen Army (el Ejercito Ciudadano), milicia sindical formada para defender a los sindicalistas contra ataques policiales durante el Cierre Patronal de 1913.

Por razón del sabotaje, la insurrección no comenzó el Domingo Santo, pues el jefe de los Voluntarios lo había cancelado, pero comenzó el día siguiente, el Lunes. Duró seis días y fue derrotada a través del bombardeo de la artillería británica que destruyó la mayor parte del centro de Dublín.

Destrucción por bombardeo británico en el 1916 a la calle Henry y la esquina del Moore Street. La columna es la de Nelson (ahora reemplazado por el "Spire") en la calle O'Connell. La ruina del GPO está a la derecha, cerca a la columna.

Destrucción por bombardeo británico en el 1916 a la calle Henry y la esquina del Moore Street. La columna es la de Nelson (ahora reemplazado por el “Spire”) en la calle O’Connell. La ruina del GPO está a la derecha, cerca a la columna.

Los insurrectos construyeron barricadas en calles y trincheras en Stephens Green pero los mayores lugares de resistencia fueron varios edificios ocupados y fortificados a los dos lados del rio Life (Liffey) y el cuartel general de la insurrección estaba localizado en el GPO (Sala Principal de Correos) en O’Connell Street (la calle principal de la ciudad).

Por razón del bombardeo y quizás del saqueo, ya el jueves, edificios en O’Connell Street estaban en llamas y por viernes el techo del GPO estaba en peligro de caer y con el plomo derritiendose. Los ocupantes lo evacuaron, llevando al herido James Connolly en camilla, con Elizabeth O’Farrell interponiendo su cuerpo entre él y la dirección de las balas que silbaban por la calle.

Los insurrectos en Moore Street

Cruzando Henry Street, entraron en el callejón Henry Lane y entraron en la primera casa de una hilera en Moore Street.  De ahí hicieron un túnel de casa a casa, hasta ocupar la hilera entera.  Lo hicieron así porque del extremo norte de Moore Street, conjunto con la calle Parnell, ya tenían los británicos una barricada con ametralladoras y habían ya rechazado un asalto irlandés, matando a media docena.

El líder de ese asalto era Michael O’Rahilly.  O’Rahilly era uno de los que cancelaron el Alzamiento para el domingo pero sin embargo al ver que procedió, se presentó para luchar. Fue gravemente herido por un balazo y cayó en el callejón que actualmente lleva su nombre, O’Rahilly Parade, y ahí escribió una nota a su mujer:
“Escribo después de que me dispararon. Querida Nancy, recibí un disparo mientras encabezaba una carga en Moore Street y tomé refugió en un portal. Mientras estuve allí, oí los hombres señalando dónde estaba e hice un perno para la calleja donde ahora estoy. He recibido más que una bala, pienso. Toneladas y toneladas de amor querida, para ti, los chicos y Nell y Anna. Fue una buena lucha de todos modos”. 

“Por favor entregar esto a Nancy O ‘ Rahilly , 40 Herbert Park, Dublín. 

“Adiós querida.”

Ese viernes, en la hilera en Moore Street, con una fuerza británica a un extremo de la calle y con otras apretando cada hora mas a la linea insurrecta, y con algunos de sus edificios ya aislados, el liderazgo de la guarnición del GPO, que incluía al comandante general Patrick Pearse, debatieron que pasos futuros tomar.  Los proyectiles de artillería seguían cayendo y las explosiones de materiales quemandose en tiendas y en fabricas se oían en una sinfonía con disparos de ametralladoras (los insurrectos no tenían ni una), y fusiles. De vez en cuando parte de un edificio colapsaba.  Aún los insurrectos en la hilera en Moore Street habían preparado una diversión con posterior asalto (suicida, casi seguro) a la barricada al extremo de la calle, con la mayor parte escapando por el callejón de Sampson Lane (ahora bloqueada, no lo estaba entonces).

Damage 1916 Dublin Metropole Hotel from above

Otra foto de la destrucción del centro de Dublín por el bombardeo británico en 1916.

Por fin, se dice que debido a la enorme cantidad de víctimas civiles, Patrick Pearse decidió no seguir con ese plan y en vez de ello, procedió a rendirse.  Llevando bandera blanca, la enfermera y miembro de Cumann na mBan, Elizabeth O’Farrell, salió a negociar con el comandante de los británicos, lo cual era acto de gran coraje, pues los británicos ya habían matado cerca a una pareja civil con su niňo, pese a estar bajo bandera blanca. El General Lowe se negó a llevar a cabo negociaciones y demandó un rendimiento total, dandoles solamente una hora para decidir.  Una hora después de volver con su ultimatum, Elizabeth O’Farrell salió por segunda vez bajo bandera blanca, acompañando esta vez a Patrick Pearse.

En la calle Parnell, cerca de Moore Street, Pearse rindió formalmente sus fuerzas insurrectas y firmó las órdenes para los Voluntarios en otros edificios para rendirse también. James Connolly firmó ordenes iguales al Ejercito Ciudadano. La desafortunada Elizabeth O’Farrell tuvo el amargo y peligroso deber de entregar esas ordenes a los varios edificios todavía ocupados por los insurrectos en una ciudad todavía en guerra.

Elizabeth O'Farrell, republicana irlandesa, fue una de los ocupantes de la hilera de Moore Street en los últimos días del Alzamiento y salió bajo bandera blanca dos veces para negociar con los militares británicos.

Elizabeth O’Farrell, republicana irlandesa, fue una de los ocupantes de la hilera de Moore Street en los últimos días del Alzamiento y salió bajo bandera blanca dos veces para negociar con los militares británicos.

Los ocupantes revolucionarios de la hilera en Moore Street cumplieron parte de sus instrucciones de rendimiento pero no con otras.  En vez de dejar sus armas en las casas, salieron con ellas al hombro, en marcha militar, en conjunto con Henry Street y ahí dieron vuelta a la izquierda hasta llegar a O’Connell Street.  Ignoraron los gritos de los oficiales británicos y la furia del General Lowe.  De ahí, a la izquierda otra vez, se fueron en marcha por O’Connell Street hasta llegar a la columna de Parnell, unos cien metros de distancia del extremo norte de Moore Street, y ahí depositaron sus armas.

Al otro lado de la misma columna existe un lugar que lleva el nombre en inglés “The Rotunda”.  Por ironía, fue ahí donde se fundaron los Voluntarios originalmente en 1913, como respuesta a los “Voluntarios de Ulster”, lealistas Británicos que se movilizaban contra autonomía para Irlanda dentro del Imperio. En el jardín del Rotunda les mantuvieron bajo guardia a la mayoría de la guarnición del GPO/ Moore Street, menos los heridos que fueron llevaron al hospital, así estuvieron el resto del sábado y la mayor parte del domingo sin comida ni agua.  A las mujeres que trataron de llevarles agua las arrestaron.

En los juicios militares siguientes, se condenó a pena de muerte a un centenar de hombres (Constance Markievicz, al enterarse de que ella no había recibido pena de muerte, supuestamente por ser mujer, demandó que la tratasen igualmente que a los hombres). Mas tarde, las sentencias de todos fueron conmutadas menos a trece a los cuales les fusilaron y a uno mas al cual le condenaron mas tarde en juicio en Londres a muerte por la horca.  A los firmantes de la Proclamación de la Independencia (imprimido en la sala del sindicato ITGWU, “La Sala de la Libertad”, pero firmado en una tienda y café alternativo en Henry Street) les fusilaron.  De los siete firmantes, cinco habían sido ocupantes de la hilera en Moore Street – Thomas Clarke, Patrick Pearse, Joseph Plunkett, Seán Mac Diarmada, y James Connolly.  El hermano de Patrick, Willie Pearse, estuvo en Moore Street y a el le fusilaron también.

El patio de la Cárcel de Kilmainham (ahora un museo) donde fusilaron a los siete firmantes de la Proclamación de la Independencia y además a otros siete.

Diferente a los otros, James Connolly era socialista revolucionario, organizador del sindicato ITGWU, comandante del Ejercito Ciudadano y de la guarnición del GPO.  Además era teórico, periodista, historiador, escritor de libros, artículos y de canciones.  Igual que Thomas Clarke y Éamonn De Valera, Connolly no había nacido en Irlanda, y pese a pertenecer a la diáspora irlandesa en Edimburgo, de hecho su primera visita a Irlanda ocurrió cuando estaba en las filas del Ejercito Británico. Pronto salió del Ejercito y se casó con una irlandesa.  Llevaron a Connolly del hospital a la Cárcel de Kilmainham y ahí, el 12 de Mayo, el último de los 12 ejecutados en 1916, fue atado a una silla por no poder ponerse de pie por razón de la gangrena en su tobillo, y le fusilaron.

La memoria histórica y la campaňa para conservar Moore Street

Muchos irlandeses y muchos turistas de otros países opinan que en cualquier otro país en Europa se hubiera hecho un monumento de la hilera y hasta distrito histórico de los alrededores. Sin embargo la mayoría de la población ni sabían hasta hace pocos años que la guarnición del GPO terminó la resistencia en Moore Street (y en la película Michael Collins, se le ve rindiendo desde el GPO, contrario a la historia de la guarnición y de Michael Collins mismo).  En 2002 la National Graves Association (Asociación para las Tumbas Nacionales), una organización voluntaria e independiente de partido, empezó a hacer campaňa para guardar parte de la calle y en 2007 se hizo monumento nacional de las casas 14-17 Moore Street.

Poco después, familiares de los que lucharon en el Alzamiento y, especialmente, de los ejecutados empezaron a hacer campaňa para guardar la hilera entera. Mientras tanto en una historia complicada y sucia, el especulador Joe O’Reilly con su empresa CChartered Land, había comprado la mayor parte de las casas en Moore Street.  Además, el centro comercial ILAC se había construido para 1981 encima del resto del casco del mercado callejero y perteneciente a Chartered Land y a Irish Life (compañía de seguros).  Las cuatro casas del “monumento nacional” también le pertenecían a Chartered Land y por reglas del estado la compañía tenía obligación y responsabilidad de mantener los edificios en buen estado.

El número 16 Moore Street, uno de las solamente cuatro casas hecho monumento nacional por el Estado.

El número 16 Moore Street, uno de las solamente cuatro casas de la hilera hecho monumento nacional por el Estado.

La placa en número 16, lo único que indica la historia de la hilera en Moore Street

La placa en número 16, lo único que indica la historia de la hilera en Moore Street

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A los que entienden las costumbres y trucos de los especuladores no les sorprenderá nada que Chartered Land no mantuviera en buen estado los cuatro edificios ni nada parecido y como evidencia existen fotos que demuestran agujeros en el techo, pinturas en las paredes, etc.  Hace unos años, Chartered Land propuso un plan de construcción de un centro comercial enorme, con entrada en O’Connell Street y pasando por Moore Street.  El plan preveía un Parking subterráneo, y un jardín en el techo.  Por no poder demoler las cuatro casas del “monumento”, se proponía incorporarlas dentro del centro comercial, poniendo café, servicios y un pequeño museo.

El plan del Parking atraería más trafico a la ciudad y no se aceptó pero mucho de lo otro si lo aceptó el Estado, pero bajo cierta condiciones. Aunque el especulador ya le debía €2.8 billones al Estado, le prometieron un subvención de €5 millones para renovar las cuatro casas.  Pero aparte de dinero, otro problema al que se enfrentaba a Chartered Land era que no todas las casas en la hilera le pertenecían a él. Dos a la esquina con O’Rahilly Parade le pertenecen al municipio de Dublín.

Aunque el especulador dice que los puestos de mercado no van a estar afectados, y llevó a varios comerciantes de los puestos a los EEUU para enseñarles un centro comercial ahí, poca gente le cree.  Los comerciantes no están seguros — la caída del mercado debido a la incertidumbre que pesa sobre la calle les hace parecer a algunos que mejor que se construya el centro.  Sin embargo, varios también han firmado la petición (abajo).

En el otoño de 2014, el Chartered Land les ofreció al Municipio tres casas en el sur de Moore Street a cambio de sus dos casas en la hilera.  Esa oferta fue recomendada por el Director del Municipio y, sorprendiendo a muchos, por el director de la comisión consultiva sobre Moore Street, el concejal Niall Ring.

Concentración en el octubre 2014 presionando al Ayuntamiento de Dublín no acordar con el plan del especulador

Concentración en el octubre 2014 presionando al Ayuntamiento de Dublín no acordar con el plan del especulador.  Estrechan los participantes paginas de la petición para guardar la memoria histórica del Moore Street.

La campaňa para guardar Moore Street lo resistió y surgió una nueva iniciativa, Save Moore Street from Demolition (Guardar la Calle Moore de la Demolición), pasando unas horas cada sábado con mesa de información en la calle, pidiendo firmas con petición a los concejales del Municipio y distribuyendo panfletos. La mesa rápidamente ganó mucho interés y apoyo con gente haciendo compras en la calle y con algunos turistas que pasaban por ahí.  Actualmente, después de 15 sábados, tienen 3,500 firmas en papel.  Es indudable que la campaňa cuenta con muchísimo mas apoyo de que lo tiene el plan de Chartered Land.

El voto fue reprogramado y Chartered Land entonces ofrecía cuatro casas a cambio frente a las dos pero por fin hicieron el voto y el intercambio fue derrotado. Al mismo tiempo se empezó una campaňa de “urgencia”, diciendo que “es muy importante tener esto arreglado para el centenario del Alzamiento”. También hicieron unas concentraciones frente a la sala del municipio. Cuando ya no se podía retrasarlo, se votó.  Los concejales del Fianna Fáil votaron en contra, igual que los del Sinn Féin y algunos del Partido Laborista, además de muchos independientes socialistas y republicanos. Los concejales a favor fueron los del partido conservador de derechas Fine Gael (ahora en el gobierno en coalición con el Partido Laborista), algunos del Laborista y algunos independientes – pero estaban en minoría.

Aunque era una victoria temporal para la campaňa, fue muy importante.  Si lo hubiera ganado Chartered Land, hubiera inmediatamente demolido las dos casas y la destrucción de la hilera hubiera comenzado. Además del resto de su historia, la última de esas casas, número 18, había tenido la primera clínica de la piel del Reino Unido (en el cual estaba Irlanda en ese aňo).

Gente firmando la petición presentado cada sábado por el grupo Save Moore Street from Demolition

Gente firmando la petición presentado cada sábado por el grupo Save Moore Street from Demolition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

La campaňa sigue.  Se puede apoyar lo por ejemplo con poner “me gusta” y agregarse a las paginas Facebook del grupo  Save Moore Street from Demolition (www.facebook.com/save.moore.st.from.demolition) y pedir a amig@s hacer lo mismo; y firmando la petición electrónica https://www.change.org/p/dublin-city-council-save-moore-street-from-demolition?share_id=QoQEYtzRXY&utm_campaign=friend_inviter_chat&utm_medium=facebook&utm_source=share_petition&utm_term=permissions_dialog_true.

También se puede escribir a los ministros con responsibilidad sobre el patrimonio y el turismo:

Turismo:  Paschal Donohoe en Minister@dttas.ie

Patrimonio: Heather Humphreys, Minister for Arts, Heritage and Gaeltacht: ministers.office@ahg.gov.ie

Fin.

El ‘Proceso de Paz Irlandés’ – ¿buena iniciativa o engaňo imperialista?

Un articulo escrito por mi en el 2010 — poco necesitaba cambiar para representar la realidad actual si no fuera para reinforzar el discurso con datos peores.

Diarmuid Breatnach

 Hoy en día Irlanda está en las noticias por las deudas especuladoras y la ruina de los bancos, convertida en deuda soberana, con la intervención del FMI y el peligro a la UE y al sistema del euro.  Pero hay otro problema de soberanía más antigua, la de ser colonia de la Gran Bretaña, poder contra el cual Irlanda lleva enfrentándose siglos. Así viene luchando por su libertad desde 1916-1922, y otra vez en la guerra que empezó en 1969 y que terminó, nos cuentan, con el Acuerdo de Viernes Santo.

La historia general del movimiento revolucionario republicano irlandés es de siglos, llena de valor y coraje, de sacrificios enormes, de miles de mártires y de mucha importancia para el movimiento mundial en contra del colonialismo y el imperialismo.  Por ejemplo, los revolucionarios de la India a finales del siglo XVIII y principios del XIX, estuvieron en contacto con republican@s irlandes@s, prestando gran atención a lo que ocurría en Irlanda. 

 La Rebelión de Pascua en 1916 ocurrió en una ciudad, Dublín,  por muchos en esos anos considerada la segunda ciudad principal del Imperio Británico y sus noticias llegaron a cada rincón de este, además de la repercusión que tuvo en otros lugares. 

El Hotel Metropole en O'Connell Street, la calle principal de Dublín. después del bombardeo británico de 1916.  Estaba situada donde hoy en día están las tiendas Penney's y Eason's.

El Hotel Metropole en O’Connell Street, la calle principal de Dublín. después del bombardeo británico de 1916. Estaba situada donde hoy en día están las tiendas Penney’s y Eason’s.

Otro ejemplo, es el impacto que causó en  Ho Chi Minh, cuando estuvo trabajando en Londres, el presenciar la procesión-funeral del Alcalde de Cork, Mc Sweeney, que murió en la cárcel de Brixton en Londres después de la huelga de hambre de 76 días.

Pero, la historia del movimiento republicano irlandés también es una historia llena de escisiones,  de reformismo, de traición.  

Los principales partidos politicos

Después de una guerra y de la liberación parcial del país en el 1921, el movimiento republicano irlandés sufrió una escisión enorme que terminó en la Guerra Civil en el 1922.  El nuevo gobierno irlandés, cuyos fuerza armada ganó en contra de los republicanos, era conservador y represivo y su partido político derechista evolucionó al Fine Gael, uno de los dos principales partidos de la burguesía irlandesa (actualmente).

 El partido republicano, el Sinn Féin, al igual que su ejercito el IRA, fueron vencidos por el ejercito del nuevo estado, un estado neo-colonialista, y tuvieron que sufrir la represión.

Bombardeo por el ejército del nuevo estado de Irlanda en el 1922 contra los Four Courts, la guarnición general de los Republicanos, empezando la Guerra Civil de Irlanda.

Bombardeo por el ejército del nuevo estado de Irlanda en el 1922 contra los Four Courts, la guarnición general de los Republicanos, empezando la Guerra Civil de Irlanda.

 

Pasaron aňos, y otra escisión  tuvo lugar en el partido republicano, cuando De Valera formó un partido nuevo reformista, el Fianna Fáil, que hoy en día es el otro partido político principal de la burguesía irlandesa. 

El tercer partido principal del sistema capitalista irlandés es el Labour Party (Partido Laboral), una mutación torcida del Partido Socialista Republicano de James Connolly, fusilado por los británicos en 1916.  El Partido Laboral ha alcanzado el poder solamente tres veces un su historia, cada vez en coalición y dos de ellas con el partido de derechas, Fine Gael (donde está actualmente).  El gobierno de los aňos 1973-1977 fue lo más represivo que sufrió Irlanda desde los aňos posteriores a su Guerra Civil.

 

Campaňas del IRA

Entre los aňos 1956-1962, el IRA inició una campaňa militar, “la Campaňa de la Frontera”, en la cual atacaron a los británicos alrededor de la frontera entre los Seis Condados (ocupados por los británicos) y el resto de Irlanda.  No tuvo éxito.

 En los aňos ’60 del pasado siglo, parecía que Sinn Féin se estaba convirtiendo en un partido popular socialista y anti-imperialista.  En la mayor parte de Irlanda, los 26 Condados, Sinn Féin inició campaňas sobre cuestiones económicas, como acerca de problemas de vivienda,  tambien sobre soberanía, como por ejemplo sobre la propiedad de la tierra, ya que todavía se tenía que pagar rentas a terratenientes británicos. 

 En el Norte, en los 6 Condados, tomaron parte en el movimiento por los Derechos Civiles.  Campaña que fue respondida por parte del Estado con represión, y, cuando esta no fue suficiente, recurrieron a una ola de violencia sectaria en 1969. 

 Por entonces los militantes del Norte se enteraron que Sinn Féin y la jefatura del IRA se habían deshecho de casi todas sus armas y el IRA tuvo muy pocas para defender sus distritos en Derry y en Belfast en contra de los asaltos de los lealistas y la policía colonial británica.  Se veía entonces claro que la  trayectoria de Sinn Féin había sido reformista, aunque muchos de los republicanos del norte lo veían como el resultado de ir “demasiado al socialismo” o de “concentrarse demasiado en la política”.  Un aňo después, en 1970, Sinn Féin tuvo otra vez una escisión, de allí salió el Sinn Féin Provisional y el IRA Provisional. 

 Los que se quedaron se llamaron Sinn Féin Oficial y su rama militar, el IRA(O) (IRA Oficial), usó sus armas casi exclusivamente en contra de sus ex-compaňeros, los Provisionales.  Cuatro aňos después, en 1974, los Oficiales sufrieron otra escisión y de allí vino el Irish Republican Socialist Party (Partido Socialista Republicana Irlandesa) y el INLA (Ejercito Irlandés para Liberación Nacional).

Miembros del IRA (O) y del INLA se mataron entre sí, asi como entre miembros del INLA y del IRA(P

 Mas adelante, el IRSP y la INLA sufrieron otras escisiones hasta quedar divididas en  cuatro partes, matándose unos a otros.

Los Provisionales, mientras tanto, siguieron con su lucha militar y política en contra del Imperio Británico, pero sin dirigirse mucho en contra del estado neo-colonialista en el sur.  Muchos militantes cayeron.  El pueblo nacionalista de los 6 Condados se unió alrededor de Sinn Féin (P) y del IRA (P) pero no se veía fin al conflicto de tantos aňos.  Buscando salida a ello, Sinn Féin empezó a plantearse alianzas con la izquierda del Partido Laboral Británico, también con los políticos de origen irlandés que habia en el partido Demócrata de los Estados Unidos, y con la base nacionalista de Fianna Fáil, partido de la burguesía irlandesa en los 26 Condados 

El Acuerdo de Viernes Santo

Ninguna de estas posibles alianzas era revolucionaria ni tenia potencialidad revolucionaria.

 En 1998, como parte de esta iniciativa, Sinn Féin  firmó el Acuerdo de Viernes Santo.

Los dirigentes de Sinn Féin dijeron a su base que sus objetivos eran abrir un espacio para poder hablar de la autodeterminación y la reunificación de Irlanda.

 En repuesta a una pregunta en una conferencia con la comunidad irlandesa en Londres en los aňos ‘90, el enviado de Sinn Féin dijo que no le parecía que los Británicos estuvieran predispuestos ya a ir hacia eso,  y que los objetivos de Sinn Féin eran ocasionar divisiones entre los lealistas (o ampliar las divisiones que ya existían) así como ganar acceso a los medios de comunicación.

Es cierto que las divisiones entre los lealistas  empeoraban, pero la principal consecuencia de esto ha sido reemplazar un partido político unionista británico principal por otro.

Tambien es verdad que Sinn Féin ha ganado acceso a los medios de comunicación; aunque continuan criticando que no hay igualdad con respecto a los otros partidos politicos principales. Sin embargo, se puede leer con frecuencia en los periódicos declaraciones suyas o verles en programas de televisión donde varios personas dan sus opiniones sobre asuntos corrientes. 

Pero, no se ve ningún paso en los 15 aňos del Acuerdo de Viernes Santo hacia los objetivos principales (según SF) del partido: Irlanda liberada de Inglaterra, reunificada, Gaélica y socialista.  Cuando se les pregunta a SF donde están las ganancias del Proceso, contestan que el partido ha aumentado su representación en el parlamento Irlandés y que son parte del gobierno de los 6 Condados del norte.  De los objetivos, nos dicen que hay que esperar a cuando tengan suficientes representantes en el parlamento Irlandés para efectuar los cambios que se quieren.

 Si, es cierto que son parte de una administración colonialista en el norte, que ataca a los pobres con recortes en las subvenciones para los servicios sociales, y que baja los sueldos de los trabajadores municipales, de los de sanidad y de enseňanza.  En el parlamento Irlandés, tiene 14 diputados en un total de 166 y no parece que en el futuro cercano vayan a lograr muchos más.

?Nos podemos preguntar, ¿para eso murieron tantos guerriller@s y tantos luchadores? 

Presos y presas republicanos y republicanas

SF nos dice que el Proceso es resultado del sacrificio de Bobby Sands y de los otros seis presos, miembros del IRA(P) (los otros tres eran del INLA), y que para eso murieron en huelga de hambre en 1981.  Eso no se sabe, pues lo único que sabemos es que lucharon por la liberación de Irlanda y que hablaron de justicia y de socialismo, de la dignidad humana y de la solidaridad internacional.  Pero si sabemos que sacrificaron sus vidas en la lucha para el reconocimiento del estatus político de los presos republicanos.  Y también sabemos que la rendición de ese status ha sido una de las condiciones de aquel Acuerdo de Viernes Santo.  

Claro, los presos del IRA(P) salieron de la cárcel (menos uno), pero quedaron adentro los que pertenecían al CIRA, al RIRA y al INLA (hasta que los del INLA firmaron también el acuerdo) Hoy en día tienen, entre las cárceles irlandesas y británicas, alrededor de 100 pres@s republican@s.  Y los presos de Maghaberry, en el norte, están ahora en campaňa por los Derechos y para que  los guardias británicos dejen de quitarles su ropa para cachearles cada vez que vienen y van del juzgado, también acosando a familiares que les visitan, acusándoles de llevar drogas (aunque entre los presos nunca se  hayan encontrado) y dando por terminadas o prohibiendo visitas por meras “sospechas”, sin que haya ninguna prueba 

?Existían alternativas?

 Cuando empezaron SF(P con el ‘proceso de paz’, lo hicieron por que se sintieron bloqueados, que estaban perdiendo el impulso que habían renovado en 1981 y que ya llevaban -el IRA (P ) –  20 años en  guerra. ¿ Tenían otras alternativas en vez de ese Acuerdo?  Parece que si. 

Podrían haber buscado alianzas con la comunidad de irlandeses en Gran Bretaňa, ya que eran alrededor de un 10% de la población en las ciudades mas grandes.  No lo hicieron.

 Podrían haber buscado alianzas con la clase trabajadora de la Gran Bretaňa.  Tampoco lo hicieron, y en su lugar buscaron alianzas con la izquierda oportunista del Partido Laboral.  Podrían haber encabezado a la clase trabajadora del los 26 Condados, es decir de la mayor parte de Irlanda – pero tampoco lo hicieron.  No se movían en los sindicatos ni tampoco hicieron esfuerzo serio de iniciar un nuevo sindicato de lucha.  No se movilizaron en contra de la emigración enorme que afectaba a la juventud

 Si se movilizaron en contra del narcotráfico y por ello les persiguió la policía.  Pero trataban igual al cannabis que a la heroína. Y al mismo tiempo vendían alcohol en sus clubes (legales e ilegales), a gente que se emborrachaba.  Además tenían negocio de contrabando con cigarros.  Es bien conocido que la nicotina y el alcohol son las dos drogas que mas daňo hacen en Irlanda, así como en la mayor parte del mundo.

 SF podría haber luchado por los derechos sociales en las dos partes de Irlanda, pero tampoco lo hicieron.  No apoyaron al derecho al aborto en el referéndo.  Apoyaron débilmente y tarde el derecho al divorcio en otro referéndum.  Los líderes de SF tuvieron miedo a perder esa parte de su base que es católica y conservadora.  En esos referendos, eran los social-demócratas y los grupos pequeños de izquierda revolucionaria quienes encabezaron la lucha por esos derechos sociales básicos.

 SF también podría haber luchado en contra de la emigración que cada año hacia que tuviera que marchar la mayor parte de la juventud. Esto era una hemorragia que sufrieron las familias de la clase trabajadora, pero igualmente la mayoría de la clase media.  Tampoco lo hicieron.

 Sinn Féin tenia la opción de meterse en la lucha laboral; por qué no,¿ no se llaman socialistas a si mismos?  Pero tampoco lo hicieron.  Por un tiempo SF tuvo un miembro que  encabezaba uno de los mayores sindicatos, pero llegó a acuerdos, con un pacto social con el gobierno y la burguesía, que supusieron perdidas para la clase trabajadora.  SF no ha hecho nunca trabajo de organización en las bases de los sindicatos.  Tampoco es capaz de hacer trabajo ideológico socialista: su propaganda de cara a la crisis financiera capitalista es parecida a la de los partidos y sindicatos social-demócratas y fue muy tarde cuando enunciaron el lema que la crisis la paguen los que la crearon.

 Sinn Féin y el IRA Provisional, después de muchos años, de dura lucha, con muchos sacrificios, pero en cual se negaron a buscar alianzas revolucionarias, ni internacionalistas ni dentro de Irlanda, terminaron por tomar un camino reformista, y aún más, bastante conservador.  Ahora buscan votos y la mayoría de sus esfuerzos quedan en elegir diputados al parlamento Irlandés. En 2010 Adams, Presidente del Sinn Féin, dió la bienvenida a la noticia que Obama intentaba visitar a Irlanda en mayo. En el mismo mes, se esperaba la visita de la Reina del Reino Unido y McGuinness comentó que la gente no debe protestar en contra de ella.

a de sus esfuerzos quedan en elegir diputados al parlamento Irlandés. En 2010 Adams, Presidente del Sinn Féin, dió la bienvenida a la noticia que Obama intentaba visitar a Irlanda en mayo. En el mismo mes, se esperaba la visita de la Reina del Reino Unido y McGuinness comentó que la gente no debe protestar en contra de ella.  

No solo la lucha por el socialismo, en el cual SF no tomó nunca parte, sino también la lucha por la autodeterminación, lo tendrán que llevar a cabo otros.

 Todo, se tendrá que hacer de nuevo.

FIN