“BELIEVE” — short poem by Donal O’Meadhra

From their homes stolen lives.
Injustice never new.
Not one crime done nor crime seen.
A sentence served undue.

Witness blind and judge astray.
Trial a kangaroo.
You want a reason to believe?
My friend, I’ll give you two.

Two sons of Craigavon Ireland,
Our voices now are due.
The cry should shout until it cracks
For justice to the two.

It happens time and time again,
Shadows of me and you.
Where once stood four and then the six,
The mirror shows the two.

Together we can make this right.
As one we’ll see it through.
You want a reason to believe?
My friend, I’ll give you two.

Believe poster J4C2

 

The poem is about the incarceration of the “Craigavon Two”, Brendan McConville and John Paul Wooton.  On the 30th of March 2012 both men were convicted and given life sentences.  They were accused of the fatal shooting of Constable Steven Carroll in Craigavon on the 9th of March 2010.  The evidence was a hotch-potch of questionable material including an “eyewitness” who only came forward a year later after both Republicans had been in jail for a considerable time, a man whose evidence was contested by that of his wife and of his own father.

The case against them was so riddled with inconsistencies and suspect material, alongside new evidence of police interference with witnesses for the Defence, that there were high hopes of both men being cleared and freed when the appeal concluded in October last year.  However, to the shock of many, including a number of Independent TDs (members of the Dáíl, the Irish parliament) and the late Gerry Conlon, their appeal was denied.

The campaign is on-going and supported by a number of organisations and individuals.  It was in support of the Two that Gerry Conlon, formerly of the Guildford Four (and a subject of the film In the Name of the Father), made his last public statement days before he died.

Their campaign website http://justiceforthecraigavontwo.com/we-are-innocent/

“Where once stood four and then the six” in the second-to-last stanza is a reference to the Guildford Four and to the Birmingham Six, ten people (all Irish save one) who in 1974 were wrongly convicted of bombings in Britain and were finally cleared only fifteen and sixteen years later.  Also wrongly convicted were the Maguire Seven (which included Giuseppe Conlon, Gerry’s father, and teenagers) and Judith Ward (a woman who was mentally ill at the time).

Advertisements

The Irish War of Independence and the retreat from stated objectives in spite of the precariousness of the British position

(This is reprinted with minimal editing from a section of a much longer piece of mine published in English and in Spanish a year ago https://rebelbreeze.wordpress.com/2014/01/30/how-can-a-people-defeat-a-stronger-invader-or-occupying-power-2/)

 

Diarmuid Breatnach

The War of Independence 1919-1921 and retreat from stated objectives

Three years later (after the 1916 Rising), the nationalist revolutionaries returned to the armed struggle, this time without a workers’ militia or an effective socialist leadership as allies, and began a political struggle which was combined a little later with a rural guerilla war which soon spread into some urban areas (particularly the cities of Dublin and Cork). The political struggle mobilised thousands and also resulted in the majority of those elected in Ireland during the General Election (in the United Kingdom, of which Ireland was part) being of their party.

The struggle in Ireland and the British response to it was generating much interest and critical comment around the world and even in political and intellectual and artistic circles within Britain itself. In addition, many nationalist and socialist revolutionaries around the world were drawing inspiration from that fierce anti-colonial struggle so near to England, within the United Kingdom itself.

The dismantling by the nationalist forces, by threats and by armed action, of much of the control network of the colonial police force, which consequently dismantled much of their counter-insurgency intelligence service, led the British to set up two new special armed police forces to counter the Irish insurgency. Both these forces gained a very bad reputation not only among the nationalists but also among many British loyalists. The special paramilitary police forces resorted more and more to torture, murder and arson but nevertheless, in some areas of Ireland such as Dublin, Kerry and Cork, they had to be reinforced by British soldiers as they were largely not able to deal effectively with the insurgents, who were growing more resolute, experienced and confident with each passing week.

However, two-and-a-half years after the beginning of the guerrilla war, a majority of the Irish political leadership of the nationalist revolutionary movement settled for the partition of their country with Irish independence for one part of it within the British Commonwealth.

Much discussion has taken part around the events that led to this development. We are told that British Prime Minister Lloyd George blackmailed the negotiating delegation with threats of “immediate and terrible war” if they did not agree to the terms. The delegation were forced to answer without being allowed to consult their comrades at home. Some say that the President of the nationalist political party, De Valera, sent an allegedly inexperienced politically Michael Collins to the negotiations, knowing that he would end up accepting a bad deal from which De Valera could then distance himself. Michael Collins, in charge of supplying the guerrillas with arms, stated afterwards that he had only a few rounds of ammunition left to supply each fighter and that the IRA, the guerrilla army, could not fight the war Lloyd George threatened. He also said that the deal would be a stepping stone towards the full independence of a united Ireland in the near future. None of those reasons appear convincing to me.

How could the leadership of a movement at the height of their successes cave in like that? Of course, the British were threatening a worse war, but they had made threats before and the Irish had met them without fear. If the IRA were truly in a difficult situation with regard to ammunition (and I’m not sure that there is any evidence for that apart from Collins’ own statement), that would be a valid reason for a reduction in their military operations, not for accepting a deal far short of what they had fought for. The IRA was, after all, a volunteer guerrilla army, much of it of a part-time nature. It could be withdrawn from offensive operations and most of the fighters could melt back into the population or, if necessary, go “on the run”.

If the military supply situation of the Irish nationalists was indeed dire in the face of the superior arms and military experience of Britain, was that the only factor to be taken into account? An army needs more than arms and experience in order to wage war – there are other factors which affect its ability and effectiveness.

The precariousness of the British situation

In 1919, at the end of the War, the British, although on the victorious side, were in a precarious position. During the war itself there had been a serious mutiny in the army (during which NCOs and officers had been killed by privates) and as the soldiers were demobbed into civilian life and into their old social conditions there was widespread dissatisfaction. Industrial strikes had been forbidden during the War (although some had taken place nonetheless) and a virtual strike movement was now under way.

In 1918 and again in 1919, police went on strike in Britain. Also during 1919, the railway workers went on strike and so did others in a wave that had been building up since the previous year. In 1918 strikes had already cost 6 million working days. This increased to nearly 35 million in 1919, with a daily average of 100,000 workers on strike. Glasgow in 1921 saw a strike with a picket of 60,000 and pitched battles with the police. The local unit of the British Army was detained in barracks by its officers and units from further away were sent in with machine guns, a howitzer and tanks.

James Wolfe in his work Mutiny in United States and British Armed forces in the Twentieth Century(http://www.mellenpress.com/mellenpress.cfm?bookid=8271&pc=9) includes the following chapter headings:

Workers pass an overturned tram in London during the 1926 British General Strike. In general, goods travelled through Britain with authorisation from the workers or under police and troop protection.

Workers pass an overturned tram in London during the 1926 British General Strike. In much of the country no transport operated unless authorised by the local trade union council or under police and army escort.

4.2 The Army Mutinies of January/February 1919
4.3 The Val de Lievre Mutiny
4.4 Three Royal Air Force Mutinies January 1919
4.5 Mutiny in the Royal Marines – Russia,
February to June 1919
4.6 Naval Mutinies of 1919
4.7 Demobilization Riots 1918/1919
4.8 The Kinmel Park Camp Riots 1919
4.9 No “Land Fit For Heroes” – the Ex-servicemen’s Riot in Luton
4 4.10 Ongoing Unrest – Mid-1919 to Year’s End

 The British Government feared their police force would be insufficient against the British workers and was concerned about the reliability of their army if used in this way. There had already been demonstrations, riots and mutinies in the armed forces about delays in demobilisation (and also in being used against the Russian Bolshevik Revolution).

Elsewhere in the British Empire things were unstable too. The Arabs were outraged at Britain’s reneging on their promise to give them their freedom in exchange for fighting the Turks and rebellions were breaking out which would continue over the next few years. The British were also facing unrest in Palestine as they began to settle Jewish immigrants who were buying up Arab land there. An uprising took place in Mesopotamia (Iraq) against the British in 1918 and again in 1919. The Third Afghan War took place in 1919; Ghandi and his followers began their campaign of civil disobedience in 1920 while in 1921 the Malabar region of India rose up in armed revolt against British rule. Secret communiques (but now accessible) between such as Winston Churchill, Lloyd George and the Chief of Staff of the British armed forces reveal concerns about the reliability of their soldiers in the future against insurrections and industrial action in Britain and even whether, as servicemen demanded demobilisation, they would have enough soldiers left for the tasks facing them throughout the Empire.

The Irish nationalist revolutionaries in 1921were in a very strong position to continue their struggle until they had won independence and quite possibly even to be the catalyst for socialist revolution in Britain and the death of the British Empire. But they backed down and gave the Empire the breathing space it needed to deal with the various hotspots of rebellion elsewhere and to prepare for the showdown with British militant trade unionists that came with the General Strike of 1926. Instead, the Treatyites turned their guns on their erstwhile comrades in the vicious Civil War that broke out in 1922. The new state executed IRA prisoners (often without recourse to a trial) and repression continued even after it had defeated the IRA in the Civil War.

If the revolutionary Irish nationalist leaders were not aware of all the problems confronting the British Empire, they were certainly aware of many of them. The 1920 hunger strike and death of McSwiney, Lord Mayor of Cork, had caught international attention and Indian nationalists had made contact with the McSwiney family. The presence of large Irish working class communities in Britain, from London to GlaSgow, provided ample opportunity for keeping abreast of industrial disputes, even if the Irish nationalists did not care to open links with British militant trade unionists. Sylvia Pankhurst, member of the famous English suffragette family and a revolutionary communist, had letters published in The Irish Worker, newspaper of the IT&GWU. The presence of large numbers of Irish still in the British Army was another source of ready information.

Anti-Treaty cartoon, 1921, depicts Ireland being coerced by Michael Collins, representing the Free State Army, along with the Catholic Church, in the service of British Imperialism

Anti-Treaty cartoon, 1921, depicts Ireland being coerced by Michael Collins, representing the Free State Army, along with the Catholic Church, in the service of British Imperialism

The revolutionary Irish nationalist leaders were mostly of petite bourgeois background and had no programme of the expropriation of the large landowners and industrialists. They did not seek to represent the interests of the Irish workers—indeed at times sections of them demonstrated a hostility to workers, preventing landless Irish rural poor seizing large estates and to divide them among themselves. Historically the petite bourgeoisie has shown itself incapable of sustaining a revolution in its own class interests and in Ireland it was inevitable that the Irish nationalists would come to follow the interests of the Irish national bourgeoisie. The Irish socialists were too few and weak to offer another pole of attraction to the petite bourgeoisie. The Irish national bourgeoisie had not been a revolutionary class since their defeat in 1798 and were not to be so now. Originally, along with the Catholic Church with which they shared many interests in common, they had declined to support the revolutionary nationalists but decided to join with them when they saw an opportunity to improve their position and also what appeared to be an imminent defeat of the British.

In the face of the evident possibilities it is difficult to avoid the conclusion that the section of revolutionary Irish nationalists who opted for the deal offered by Lloyd George did so because they preferred it to the alternatives. They preferred to settle for a slice rather than fight for the whole cake. And the Irish bourgeoisie would do well out of the deal, even if the majority of the population did not. The words of James Connolly that the working class were “the incorruptible heirs” of Ireland’s fight had a corollary – that the Irish bourgeoisie would always compromise the struggle. It is also possible that the alternative the nationalists feared was not so much “immediate and terrible war” but rather a possible Irish social revolution in which they would lose their privileges.

Irish Free State bombardment 4 Courts

Start of the Irish Civil War 1922: Irish Free State bombardment, with cannon on loan from the British Army, of the Republican HQ at the Four Courts, Dublin.

 

Another serious challenge to the Empire from Irish nationalist revolutionaries would not take place until nearly fifty years later, and it would be largely confined to the colony of the Six Counties.

end selected extract

JANUARY — BIRTHS AND STATE EXECUTIONS

Diarmuid Breatnach

 

The month of January is the start of the year, according to the calendar most of us use but, for the Celts and some other peoples, it was the last month of winter, which had begun in November, after the feast of Samhain.

I am notified of many birthdays in January from among my Facebook friends.  That would seem to indicate a higher rate of conception at the end of March/ early April and onwards but a quick search on the internet did not supply me comparative figures.  However, in our climate, new food begins to be available inland in January as salmon arrive to spawn and with sheep lactating from February.  Onwards from there, plants begin to grow again and birds lay eggs, animals give birth and so on.  The pregnant mother needs a ready supply of food to sustain a viable pregnancy.

Though January may be a month of births, from what I see of history it is also a month of deaths … early, unnatural deaths …. of executions, in fact.  These particular executions to which I refer took place in Ireland and in the United States of America and they were carried out by the respective states of those countries.

 

Executions by the Irish Free State

This week saw the anniversary of five such executions, on the 15th January 1923 — executions by the Free State of IRA Volunteers.  Four of these were in Roscrea and the fifth was in Carlow: Vol.F. Burke; Vol.Patrick Russell; Vol.Martin Shea; Vol.Patrick MacNamara; Vol.James Lillis.

They were not the first executions by the Free State: eight had been executed the previous November and thirteen in December.  The killing for the new year of 1923 had begun with five in Dublin on the 8th January and another three in Dundalk.

The Mountjoy Four executions by the Irish Free State in 1922 of one IRA Volunteer from each province.

The Mountjoy Four reprisal executions by the Irish Free State on 8th December 1922 of one IRA Volunteer from each province.

Nor were those executed on the 15th January to be the last for that month: on the 20th another eleven stood against a wall to be shot by soldiers of the Irish state; on the 22nd, another three; on the 25th, two more; and another four on the 26th before the month’s toll of 34 had been reached. As we progress through the year, each month will contain the anniversary of an executed volunteer and in all but one, multiple executions.

Apart from those who died while fighting, seventy-seven Volunteers and two other supporters of the struggle were officially executed by the Irish Free State between November 1922 and 29th December 1923. In addition there were many (106-155) murdered without being acknowledged by Free State forces — shot (sometimes after torture) and their bodies dumped in streets, on mountains, in quarries .1

Soiidarity demonstration outside Mountjoy Jail, probably organized by Cumann na mBan, perhaps in protest at Mountjoy executions December 1922

Soiidarity demonstration outside Mountjoy Jail, probably organized by Cumann na mBan, perhaps in protest at Mountjoy executions December 1922

These deeds and others led to the composition of a number of songs, among the best of which are in my opinion Martyrs of ’22  (sung to the air of The Foggy Dew) and Take It Down from the Mast.  The latter was written in 1923 by James Ryan, containing two verses about the Six Counties which one doesn’t normally hear sung.  Dominic Behan in the 1950s added a verse of his own about the four executions by the State in reprisal for the assassination of TD Sean Hales, when the State deliberately shot one Volunteer from each province, each of whom had been in custody when the assassination took place: Rory O’Connor, Liam Mellows, Richard Barrett, Joseph McKelvey,  Dominic Behan recorded the latter in the 1950s: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-b2EL8Jytao

This was the bloody baptism of the new state, a neo-colony state of twenty-six counties on a partitioned island, with six counties remaining a British colony.

 

MARTYRS OF ’22

1

When they heard the call of a cause laid low,
They sprang to their guns again;
And the pride of all was the first to fall —
The glory of our fighting men.
In the days to come when with pipe and drum,
You’ll follow in the ways they knew,
When their praise you’ll sing, let the echoes ring
To the memory of Cathal Brugha.

2

Brave Liam Lynch on the mountainside
Felll a victim to the foe
And Danny Lacey for Ireland died
in the Glen of Aherlow
Neil Boyle and Quinn from the North came down
To stand with the faithful and true
And we’ll sing their praise in the freedom days
‘Mong the heroes of ’22.

 3

Some fell in the proud red rush of war
And some by the treacherous blow,
Like the martyrs four in Dublin Town,
And their comrades at Dromboe:
And a hundred more in barrack squares
and by lonely roadsides too:
Without fear they died and we speak with pride
of the martyrs of ’22.

 

 
Executions of “Molly Maguires”

Wednesday, 14th January, was the anniversary of the executions of James McDonnell and Charles Sharp at Mauch Chunk jail, Pennsylvania. Both had been accused of being “Molly Maguires”, a resistance group of workers, mostly miners, in the Pennsylvania region. Today, the 16th, is the anniversary of the execution of another “Molly”, Martin Bergin; 20 were executed over two years. And many more had been murdered in their homes or ambushed — many others had been beaten; these activities were carried out by “vigilantes” hired by the coal-mine owners and by Iron & Coal Guards, also employed by them.

The exact origin of the name Molly Maguires is uncertain but they were among a number of agrarian resistance organizations of previous years in Ireland; according to accounts, they gathered at night wearing women’s smocks over their clothes to attack landlords and their agents. Since these smocks tended to be white in colour, Whiteboys or Buachaillí Bána was another name for them.  

Molly Maguires tribute statue by Zenos Frudrakis in Molly Maguires Memorial Park, Mahanoy City, Pennsylvania, USA

Molly Maguires tribute statue by Zenos Frudrakis in Molly Maguires Memorial Park, Mahanoy City, Pennsylvania, USA

Somewhat Ironically, the state of Pennsylvania was itself named after a man with connections to Ireland: William Penn’s father, the original William, had commanded a ship in the Royal Navy during the suppression of the Irish uprising in 1641, for which he had been given estates in Ireland by Cromwell.

His son, William went to live on the Irish estates for a while and was suppressing Irish resistance there in 1666. Not lot long afterwards he became a Quaker in Cork.

In 1681 the younger Penn’s efforts to combine a number of Quaker settlements in what is now the eastern United States were successful when he was granted a charter by King Charles II to develop the colony. The governance principles he outlined there are credited with influencing the later Constitution of the United States.
 Charles II added the name “Penn” to William’s chosen name of “Sylvania” for the colony, in honour of the senior Penn’s naval service (he had by then become an Admiral).

Less than two hundred years later, Pennsylvania was one of the United States of America and the anthracite coal discovered there was being mined by US capitalists. The mine owners squeezed their workers as hard as they could and regularly replaced them with workers who were emigrating in mass to the United States in the mid-19th Century.

According to James D. Horan and Howard Swiggett, who wrote The Pinkerton Story sympathetically about the detective agency, about 22,000 coal miners worked in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, at this time and 5,500 of these (a quarter) were children between the ages of seven and sixteen years. According to Richard M. Boyer and Herbert M. Morais in Labor’s Untold Story, the children earned between one and three dollars a week separating slate from the coal. Miners who were to injured or too old to work at the coal face were put to picking out slate at the “breakers”, crushing machines for breaking the coal into manageable sizes. In that way, many of the elderly miners finished their mining days as they had begun in their youth.  The life of the miners was a “bitter, terrible struggle” (Horan and Swiggett).

Workers who were illiterate and immigrants without English were unable to read safety notices, such as they were. In addition immigrants faced discrimination and Irish Catholics, who began to arrive in large numbers in the United States after the Great Hunger of 1845-1849 faced particular discrimination although (or because) most spoke English (as a second language to Irish, in many cases). The mine-owners often employed Englishmen and Welsh as supervisors and police which also led to divisions along ethnic lines.

As well as wages being low and working conditions terrible, with deaths and serious injuries at work in their hundreds every year, the mine-owners cut corners by failing to ensure good pit props and refused to install safety features such as ventilating or pumping systems or emergency exits. Boyer and Morais quote statistics of 566 miners killed and 1,655 seriously injured over a seven-year period (Labor, the Untold Story).

In 1869 a fire at the Avondale Mine in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, cost the lives of 110 miners. There had been no emergency exit for the men’s escape. It is a measure of the influence of the mine and iron capitalists that the jury at the inquest into the deaths did not apportion blame to the mine-owner, although it did add a rider recommending the instalation of emergency exits in all mines.

Earlier at the scene, as the bodies were being recovered from the mine, a man had mounted a wagon to address the thousands of miners who had arrived from surrounding communities: “Men, if you must die with your boots on, die for your families, your homes, your country, but do not longer consent to die, like rats in a trap, for those who have no more interest in you than in the pick you dig with.”

The speaker was John Siney, a leader of the Workingmen’s Benevolent Association, a trade union that had been organizing among the miners for some time; his words were a call to unionize and thousands did so there and then and over the following days.

Trade union organisers in the USA throughout the 19th Century (and later) were routinely subject to harassment, threats and often much worse and the workers at times responded in kind. Shooting and stabbing incidents were far from unknown, with fifty unexplained murders in Schuykill County between 1863 and 1867. The mine-owners had the Coal and Iron Police force and were known to hire additional “vigilantes” to intimidate and punish trade union organisers. They also hired the Pinkerton Detective Agency to gather intelligence on union organisers and on the Molly Maguires.

The employers watched concerned as the WBA trade union grew to 30,000 strong with around 85% membership among the coal miners of the area, including nearly all the Irish. The “Great Panic” of 1873 changed the situation. A stock crash due to over-expansion was followed by a decrease in the money supply and staggering levels of unemployment followed. As is often the case, the capitalists maintained their life-styles while claiming inability to pay living wages to their workers. As is often the case too, they used the opportunity of high unemployment to force worse wages and conditions upon the workers.

One of those capitalists owned two-thirds of the mines in the southeastern Pennsylvania area; he was Franklin B. Gowen, owner of the Reading & Philadelphia Railroad and of the Reading & Philadelphia Coal & Iron Company. Gowen was determined to break the WBA and formed his own union of employers, the Anthracite Board of Trade; in December 1874 they announced a 20% cut in wages for their workers. On 1st January 1875 the WBA brought their members out on strike.

The history of the coal mines of Pennsylvania and their terrible conditions and mortality in the 19th Century, the extreme exploitation of the mine-owners’ systems and their use of prejudiced and corrupt courts, media and vigilantes to have their way, is a long one. The history of the workers’ resistance is also a long one and the “Molly Maguires” were a part of it. Their own history is also dogged by controversy, with some even doubting the existence of the Mollies, claiming that the secret society was an invention of the employers to create panic and to associate the unionized workers with violence in the minds of the public. The brief notes following are part of a narrative accepted by some historians but not by others.

In order to defend themselves, the miners developed two types of organisation which, in many areas where the workers were Irish, existed side by side. One was the Workingmen’s Benevolent Association, a trade union the methods of which were those of industrial action, demonstrations and attempts to use the legal system in order to improve working conditions and gain better remuneration for the workers. The leaders of the WBA condemned violence used by workers as well, of course, as denouncing the employers’ violence.

The other was the Molly Maguires, a secret oath-bound society which organized under the cover of the Ancient Order of Hibernians. The AOH in turn was a self-help or fraternal organization for Catholics of Irish origin, mostly in the Irish diaspora, particularly in the USA, where early Catholic Irish migrants had encountered much hostility and discrimination from the WASP establishment and from “nativist” groups. In keeping with the history of their namesakes, the Molly Maguires of the USA were prepared to use violence in response to the violence of their employers.

In March1875, Edward Coyle, a leading member of the union and of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, was murdered, as was another member of the AOH; a miners’ meeting was attacked and a mine-owner fired into a group of miners (Boyer and Morais).

Reprisals by the Mollies followed as attacks on their members and the miners in general escalated. These attacks were carried out by State police, the Coal and Iron Police of the mine-owners and in particular by the “Vigilantes”, also hired by the mine-owners.

The information supplied by the Pinkerton Agents in their daily reports, although often only initial speculations from surveillance, were used to target individuals who were then often murdered2. One of the Pinkerton agents, James McParlan3 from Co. Armagh, who had penetrated the Mollies under cover of the alias “James McKenna”, was reportedly furious that his reports were being used to target people for the “Vigilantes”, including people he considered innocent. His job as he saw it was to gather information which would stand up in court to convict the leading Mollies, sentence them to death and break the organisation. Although his employer tried to pacify him in fact Alan Pinkerton himself had urged the mine-owners to employ “vigilantes”.

John Kehoe Molly Maguire

John “Black Jack” Kehoe, allegedly one of the leaders of the Molly Maguires

 

The mine-owners pursued a dual strategy of violence against Mollies and other leaders and members of the WBA, while also preparing legal charges against trade union officials and collecting evidence to have the Mollies tried for murder. The courts collaborated, as did the mass media. Much of the clergy were not found wanting either and denounced the union leaders to their congregations.

The state militia and the Coal and Iron Police patrolled the district, maintaining an intimidatory presence during the strike. On May 12th John Siney, a leader of the WBA was arrested at a demonstration against the importation of strike-breakers. Siney had opposed the strike and advocated seeking arbitration. Another 27 union officials were arrested on conspiracy charges. Judge Owes’ words while sentencing two of them are indicative of the side on which the legal system was, at least in Pennsylvania in 1875:
“I find you, Joyce, to be President of the Union and you, Maloney, to be Secretary and therefore I sentence you to one year’s imprisonment.”

Stories appeared in the media of strikes as far away as Jersey City in Illinois and in the Ohio mine-fields, all allegedly inspired by the Mollies. Much of the anti-union propaganda in the media was directly provided by Gowen who planted stories therein of murder and arson by the secret society.

With the workers starving and deaths among children and the infirm, surrounded by armed representatives of the employers and the state militia (also friendly to the employers), their leaders arrested, the union nearly collapsed and the strike was broken, miners going back to work on a 20% cut in their wages. The strike had lasted six months but the Mollies fought on and McPartland noted increased support for them, including among union members who had earlier declined to support their methods.

When the Mollies were brought to trial in a number of different court cases of irregular conduct, Gowen had himself appointed as Chief Prosecutor by the State. One of the accused, Kerrigan, turned state’s evidence and his and McPartland’s evidence helped send 10 Molly Maguires to their deaths: Michael Doyle, Edward Kelly, Alex Campbell, McGeehan, Carroll, Duffy, James Boyle, James Roarity, Tom Munley, McAllister.

Execution of Molly Maguire 1877 (French soure: I have been unable to find the name of the victim or the exact date of his execution

Execution of Molly Maguire 1877 (French soure: I have been unable to find the name of the victim or the exact date of his execution)

In that area and in many other major industrial areas across the United States throughout the rest of that century and well into the next, employers continued to use spies and “vigilantes”, company police, local law enforcement agencies, state militia, labour-hostile press, fixed juries and biased judges to break workers’ defence organisations, often martyring their leaders and supporters.

A number of books have been published about the Molly Maguires and their story of has been dramatised in the film of the name (1970), starring Sean Connery as Jack Kehoe and Richard Harris as McPartland. The Mollies have also been celebrated in a number of songs, among which the lyrics of the Dubliner’s version is probably the worst and those of The Sons of Molly Maguire are the best I have heard (see Youtube recording link below end of article).

Molly Maguire tribute banner ITGWU (Cork branch)

Molly Maguire tribute banner ITGWU (Cork branch)

In June 2013 the East Wall History Group organized a talk on the Mollies by US Irish author John Kearns at the Sean O’Casey Centre in Dublin’s North Wall area (video of the talk and audio of a radio interview with the author are accessible from this link:http://eastwallforall.ie/?p=1505).

In 1979, on a petition by one of John “Black Jack” Kehoe’s descendants and after an official investigation, Governor of Pennsylvania Milton Shapp posthumously pardoned Kehoe, who had proclaimed his innocence until his death (as had Alex Campbell). Shapp praised Kehoe and the others executed as “martyrs to labor” and heroes in a struggle for fair treatment for workers and the building of their trade union.

 

End

 

The Sons of Molly Maguire: 

 

Footnotes:

1  I gratefully acknowledge the listing of that wonderful voluntary and non-party organisation, the Irish National Graves Association, which has done such important work to document and honour those who have fallen in the struggle for freedom of the people of our land http://www.nga.ie/Civil%20War-77_Executions.php

2  In what one may see as a strange coincidence, among the Mollie victims of Vigilante violence were cousins of Pat O’Donnell, with whom he had stayed for some time. Pat O’Donnell shot dead Carey in 1883 because he had turned state evidence against the Invincibles (see https://rebelbreeze.wordpress.com/2014/12/17/pat-odonnell-patriot-or-murderer/).

3  Also sometimes referred to as “McParlan”. In addition some researchers have expressed the opinion that there in fact two McParlands, brothers, working for Pinkerton against the Molly Maguires.

 

LÁ FHÉILE STIOFÁIN/ ST. STEPHENS’ DAY

Singing Wren 46 (Michael Finn)  ” We made it!  We made it!  Safe for another year!”

Wren on rock

“Shut up, you idiot!  The day’s not over yet!”

Meanwhile, not far away ….

Wren Boys SligoMummers Sligo maybe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE WREN-BOY TRADITION IN IRELAND

In England it is called “Boxing Day” but in Ireland the 26th of December is “St. Stephen’s Day”.  Despite the Christian designation it has long been the occasion in Ireland for customs much closer to paganism.

It was common for a group of boys (usually) to gather and hunt down a wren.  The wren can fly but tends to do so in short bursts from bush to bush and so can be hunted down by determined boys.  The bird might be killed or kept alive, tied to a staff or in a miniature bower constructed for the occasion.

The Wren Boys would then parade it from house to house while they themselves appeared dressed in costume and/or with painted faces.  In some areas they might only carry staff or wands decorated with colourful ribbons and metallic paper while they might in other areas dress in elaborate costumes, some of them made of straw (Straw Boys) and these were sometimes also known as Mummers although a distinction should be drawn between these two groups.  The Mummers in particular would have involved acting repertoires with traditional character roles and costumes, music and dance routines while the simpler Wren Boys might each just contribute a short dance, piece of music or song.  In all cases traditional phrases were used upon arrival, the Mummers having the largest repertoire for in fact they were producing a kind of mini-play.

The origins of the customs are the subject of debate but a number of Irish folk tales surround the wren.  The bird is said in one story to have betrayed the Gaels to the Vikings, leading to the defeat of the former.  There is a Traveller tradition that accuses the wren of betraying Jesus Christ to soldiers while another tradition has the bird supplying the nails (its claws) for the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.  Yet another tradition has the wren as King of the Birds, having used its cunning in a competition to determine who would be the avian King, hiding itself under the Eagle’s wind and flying out above the exhausted bird when it seemed to have won, having left all others behind and could fly no higher.

By the 1960s the Wren Boy custom was beginning to die out even in areas where it had held fast but it slowly began to be revived by some enthusiasts.  Nowadays fake wrens are used.  Christmas Day in Ireland was traditionally a day to go to religious service and to spend at home with family or to go visiting neighbours.  It was not a day of presents or of lights or Christmas Trees, customs brought in by the English colonizers in particular from Prince Albert, the British Queen Victoria’s royal consort, who was German.  St. Stephen’s Day may have celebrated the Winter Solstice (the wren being a bird that on occasion sings even in winter) but moved to a Christian feast day; in any case it produced colour and excitement at a time which did not have the religious and commercial Christmas season to which, in decades, we have become accustomed.

The lovely song The Boys of Barr na Sráide from a poem by Sigerson Clifford takes as its binding thread the boys in his childhood with whom Sigurson went “hunting the wren”.  It is sung here by Muhammed Al-Hussaini (currently resident in London and part of the singing circle of Comhaltas Ceoltóirí na hÉireann, meeting in the Camden Irish Centre).  There are recordings of others performing this song well but the unusual origin of this one as well as its quality persuaded me to choose this one.  In addition, I had the pleasure of participating in a singing circle with this lovely and modest singer in London in October this year (see The London Visit on the blog), who greeted me in Irish.  Muhammed also plays the violin on this, accompanied by Mark Patterson on mandolin and Paul Sims on guitar.

 

ends.

HOW TO SILENCE AN ETHNIC COMMUNITY

Diarmuid Breatnach, Feabhra 2014.

When the civil rights movement began in 1968 in the Six Counties, the general attitude in Britain, on the street and even in much of the media, was supportive of the campaigners.  This was reinforced by the majority of the Irish community there, an estimated average of 10% of the population of most British main cities.  The Irish were the largest ethnic minority in Britain and the longest-established, constantly renewed by high emigration since the Great Hunger of 1845-1849 (although seasonal and other migration had been a pattern long before that).

In the Six Counties, the sectarian police force were unable to vanquish the resistance  and “liberated areas” emerged.  The British imperialist ruling class could no longer tolerate this state of affairs and sent in its Army to “restore order” and also to “clear the no-go areas”.   As the Provisional IRA (mostly), later also the INLA, entered the struggle against the British Army in the Six Counties, the mood in Britain began to shift somewhat.  After all, a British soldier dead meant a British family mourning, whilst the same did not apply at all with an RUC or B-Special killed (however they might think of themselves as “British”).  But still the Irish community in Britain held the line in solidarity with the support of large sections of the British Left (many of whom happened to be Irish or of Irish descent as well).  Regular demonstrations were held, as well as pickets and public meetings.  People wrote leaflets and letters.  Solidarity delegations were sent.  MPs were lobbied to ask questions in the House of Commons, which some did.

The introduction of Internment without trial in the Six Counties in 1971 was strongly protested, as was the Ballymurphy Massacre by the Paras that same year.  The Bloody Sunday massacre in Derry in 1972 led to protests in many areas of Britain, including solidarity strikes on building sites and a huge demonstration in London — as the head of the wide packed march passed Trafalgar Square on its way to Downing Street, the end of it was still leaving Hyde Park Corner, where it had begun some time earlier, about 3 kilometres away.  When the lines of police in Whitheall stopped those leading the march from presenting thirteen “coffins” to No.10 Downing Street, the residence of the Prime Minister, some of the “coffins” were thrown at the police and a riot began.  Nor was it the only riot — an earlier march had tried to break through the heavy police cordon in front of Northern Ireland House at Green Park, a couple of mounted police had been knocked off their horses and the demonstration had ended with protesters being chased through Green Park by police on foot and in vehicles.

Protests even made it into the House of Commons as in 1970 when an Irishman called Roche threw a tear gas cannister in among MPs to make them aware of the tons of CS gas being pumped into the Bogside and other areas by the RUC (later by the British Army too),  while in 1972, after Bloody Sunday, then People’s Democracy MP Bernadette Devlin (now McAlliskey and no longer an MP) walked up to the Home Secretary, Reginald Maudling, and slapped him in the face.

The IRA bombing campaign in Britain in particular impacted negatively to some extent on sympathy for the Irish struggle but solidarity from the Irish community, along with large elements in the British Left was still strong, despite some potentially lethal explosions such as postal pillar box bombs and the Post Office Tower bombing in 1971, which luckily did not cause any injuries.  All that was to change in 1974.

The Birmingham Pub Bombing

In October and November 1974, the Guildford and Woolwich Pub Bombings killed six soldiers and two civilians whilst a further sixty-five people were injured (mostly in the Guildford explosion, where five of the dead had been).  The pubs had been in regular use by personnel of the British Army but were also used by a number of civilians.

In between those two bombings, another two bombs exploded in completely civilian bars in Birmingham, killing 21 and injuring 182.  It stunned the Irish community and the friendly British Left.  The media of course went to town with “Bastards!” being used as a headline for the first time by a British tabloid, over a photograph of the atrocity.  At first no-one claimed the Birmingham bombing and then it was denied by the IRA, who up to then had a very reliable record with regard to taking ownership of events (which could not be said of the Royal Ulster Constabulary or of the British Army).  Some kind of “black operation” was the suspicion of many.  As we know now and as some in the IRA admitted quite some time later, it had been an IRA bomb and the person whose responsibility it had been to telephone the warning, in a time long before mobile phones, had found a number of out-of-order public telephone kiosks and the warning had been too late.

Up to then, the Midlands IRA unit or units had been exploding bombs at targets without injury to civilians when one of their volunteers, James McDade, was killed in a premature explosion while planting a bomb at a telephone exchange in Coventry.  His remains were prepared for return to Ireland and burial in his native Belfast.  McDade had been well known in the Birmingham Irish community and through much of the Midlands as a talented GAA (Gaelic sports) player and was popular as a singer with a tenor voice.  Eddie Caughey, of the Birmingham branch of Provisional Sinn Féin (later the party closed down all branches outside Ireland), was among others accompanying the coffin on McDade’s last journey.  Another group of people set off from Britain to attend the funeral, including five Irishmen from the Six Counties resident in Birmingham, catching a train to connect with the ferry at Heysham.

Coincidentally, the Birmingham group arrived for the Heysham ferry the same evening as the Birmingham bombs exploded, although they were unaware of this.  The five men were taken from the ferry at Heysham by police and interrogated, later beaten up by the West Midlands Serious Crime Squad and threatened with guns and dogs, four of them forced to confess to things they had not done; they were then were charged with multiple murder along with another Irishman from the Six Counties who had seen them off at the New Street Birmingham train station.  They six men were taken to Winson Green prison where they received another savage beating from screws so that when they turned up in court all were bruised and battered.  One screw witness many years later was reported to have said that he had not participated and found the brutality sickening (he may have been the inspiration for the scene in the H-Blocks 2008 film “Hunger” directed by McQueen, where a screw hides away from the other screws in riot gear as they go in to beat the “blanket men”).

The six Birmingham Irish were found guilty in a travesty of a trial and became “the Birmingham Six”.  Another three, at least one of whom was an IRA volunteer and probably the organiser of the bombings, were convicted on charges relating to explosives and received nine years’ jail.

The Birmingham Six in 1974

The Birmingham Six in 1974 — innocent but Irish in Britain — sixteen years in prison, twenty-six before compensated. No state employee has ever been convicted for this deliberate injustice.

Subsequent appeals and prosecutions by the Birmingham Six of officers for assault etc. were all dismissed or ruled out of order by the state judicial system. Individuals in the Irish community, such as Sr. Sarah Clarke, began to campaign for them. In 1976, Fr.s Raymond Murray and Denis Faul in the Six Counties published their booklet The Birmingham Framework: Six innocent men framed for the Birmingham Bombings.  In 1981 the newly-formed Irish in Britain Representation Group became the first wide Irish community organisation in Britain to take up their case and made representations on behalf of the Six, including to the Irish Embassy in London (“The Birmingham who?” asked the Ambassador at the time, according to some IBRG who participated in the delegation).

In 1985 after repeated lobbying by the Birmingham Six Campaign, the IBRG and individuals, World In Action (Granada, ITV) made the first programme throwing doubt on the guilt of the Six. A year later, Chris Mullins (a researcher for the World in Action programme and later an MP and a Government Minister) published his book declaring their innocence. Campaigning continued in Britain and in Ireland.

But it was not until 1991, SIXTEEN YEARS after their unjust conviction, that they were finally released, their convictions quashed. The lives of many of them were ruined — marriages had broken up, livelihoods were gone, some never recovered from the trauma. It was not until ANOTHER TEN YEARS before they were awarded financial compensation.

Not one judge, one police officer or one prison officer was ever convicted of assault or perversion of the cause of justice. The British forensic scientist whose “evidence” and “expertise” were used to sway the jury to convict the Birmingham Six, Frank Skuse, suffered a blow to his professional reputation but that was all.

The impression is often given that the Birmingham Six jury was blinded by expert forensic evidence and/or that it could not be known then that the evidence was wrong. But it is also often forgotten that Skuse’s “evidence” contained contradictions suggesting interference and that his forensic conclusions were contested at the trial by those of another forensic practitioner, Dr Hugh Kenneth Black FRIC, the former HM Chief Inspector of Explosives, Home Office. The judge chose to believe Skuse and to sway the jury in that direction. Part of the judgement of the Court of Appeal that freed them in 1991 was that  “Dr. Skuse’s conclusion was wrong, and demonstrably wrong, judged even by the state of forensic science in 1974.”

The Guildford and Woolwich Pub Bombings

In 1977, the “Balcolme Street” IRA unit (so named because of the address where they were trapped and besieged before capture) informed the authorities through their trial lawyers that they were responsible for the Guildford and Woolwich bombings.  This was an unprecedented step for the IRA but their claim was denied by the State.  The Home Office accepted in a memorandum at some point later that the Guildford Four were “probably not terrorists” but thought there was not enough to justify their release.  Eventually falsified police notes were found by an investigating police detective and they were used as a reason to throw doubt on the whole case against the Four and they walked free in 1989.  They had spent fifteen years in British jails and the father of one, Gerry Conlon, had died in prison.

Guildford Four

The Guildford Four around the time of their arrest in 1974. Three of them were Irish in Britain but although obviously not anything like IRA, were framed and jailed. No state employee has ever paid for this crime against them or the other Irish framed prisoners.

Giuseppe Conlon

Giuseppe Conlon, who came to London to help his son Gerry when he heard of his wrongful arrest for the Guildford Pub Bombings. Incredibly, he was also convicted, along with the Maguire Seven — all innocent, but Irish in Britain. Giuseppe Conlon died in prison before the Maguire Seven were finally found “not guilty” on appeal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Maguire Seven had to wait another two years before their convictions were quashed in 1991, so that they spent 17 years in British jails. The court accepted that members of the London Metropolitan Police beat some of them into confessing to the crimes as well as withholding information that would have cleared them (this last was also a feature of the Guildford Four case).

In 2005, Tony Blair, then British Prime Minister, apologised to the surviving ten and to relatives of all the eleven for their “ordeal and injustice”.  The British media, which had played a key role in creating the public atmosphere in which huge injustices could be and were done, never apologised nor even reviewed their procedures and guidelines and in fact even after their release, one British tabloid had to pay out libel compensation for suggesting that some of the framed prisoners were guilty but had got off on some kind of technicality.  And again,  not one forensic expert, not one Judge or state Minister was ever charged; some detectives were eventually charged with perjury but were never tried, nor were they ever charged with assault — not to mention torture.

The Prevention of Terrorism (sic) Act 1974

Back at the time when those bombings occurred, a legal measure of huge importance was being planned: at the end of November 1974,  the Prevention of Terrorism Act was rushed through British Parliament.  The PTA superseded the regulations requiring the police to charge a suspect within 48 hours and to bring them before a judge as early as possible or to release them on bail.    The PTA legislation permitted holding of “suspects” for 5 days without charge and without access to lawyers, visitors or their own doctor; it also permitted stopping and questioning and searching without need to establish a reason and house raids and searches.  Later this power was extended to seven days.

Finally, it permitted exclusion from Britain and deportation to the Six Counties (even though that was classed as part of the United Kingdom and therefore constituted internal exile), without any need to charge or show evidence of wrongdoing.  One victim of such banning for a number of years was Brendan McGill, Provisional Sinn Féin organiser in Britain at the time (but who joined Republican Sinn Féin in 1986; deceased in 2011); he was banned from Britain despite having been a resident  for 21 years and had his home, family and a shop in London.

Inside Birmingham Pub Bombing

Inside the Mulberry Bush, one of two target pubs in Birmingham in which 21 people were killed and 182 injured by two failed-warning IRA bombs in 1974. The horror helped disarm people ideologically and prepared the public, including the Irish diaspora, for the introduction of the Prevention of Terrorism Act and a campaign of terror against the Irish community in Britain.

It was clear to observers that the Act had been already in preparation; the shocking Birmingham explosion a few weeks earlier provided the right atmosphere for its introduction.  Eddie Caughey, the Birmingham-based Irish Republican who had accompanied the remains of IRA volunteer James Mc Dade to Belfast, became the first person to be detained and questioned under the PTA but that was to happen to thousands in the decades to follow, nearly every one of them Irish.  According to the West Midlands PTA Research & Welfare Association (set up by Midlands activists of the IBRG), 7,192 people were detained under the PTA between 1974 and 1992.  Only 629 of these (8.7%) were subsequently charged with any offence and most of those were totally unrelated to any “terrorist” acts.  Even when charges came under the Act they were only such charges as being a member of a proscribed organisation, assisting a proscribed organisation etc; one such conviction was of a young man for having pro-IRA posters and a badge in his possession.

Again according to the West Midlands organisation, 86,000 people each year between 1987 and 1990  were ‘examined’ for more than an hour at British ports and airports under the PTA.  The watchdog organisation admits that these are only recorded stops and also did not include anyone stopped at a port or airport for less than an hour.

It only happened to me once: travelling alone from London home to Dublin on holiday with my daughter of seven years, I was taken aside by Special Branch at Heathrow and questioned as to my London address, occupation, destination in Ireland, length of stay and purpose in travelling to Dublin.  The questioning was not heavy and probably lasted less than ten or fifteen minutes and, unlike many others, I was not made to miss my plane.  But it was really frightening to know that I could be taken in for up to seven days and the overarching apprehension was about what would happen to my daughter.   Those days it was not unusual for people, as did I, to make arrangements if they were not going to be met upon arrival, to telephone a friend or family each side, so that in the absence of such, enquiries could be initiated with the police.

“PTA Telephone Trees” were established and those who volunteered for service on them might receive a phone call in the early hours of the morning to say that this or that person had been arrested, or was missing, and to begin making phone calls to other people on the “tree” and/or to a named police station.  The purpose of the calls was not only to gather possible information (the police often denied the presence of someone known to be in their cells) but also to make the police aware that their detainees had friends outside who were making enquiries.

It was a testament perhaps to the level of fear engendered that although Irish solidarity pickets were taking place in various places, including of course London, it was not until the early 1990s that a picket was first placed on Paddington Green Police station, the usual destination of people detained under the PTA in London. “The Lubyanka of the Irish Community”, with its sixteen windowless underground cells, too hot in summer and too cold in winter, with a 7-day incommunicado detention period, was frightening enough but had developed a terror mystique.

It was a Kilburn-based British Left group (but with high Irish membership and which had been expelled from the Troops Out Movement) which placed the first pickets on Paddington Green  and some time later the Saoirse campaign and the Wolfe Tone Society (Provisional SF support group in London) did so too.  These symbolic acts helped to somewhat erode the terror of the place but the overall atmosphere had been dispelled by the mobilisations in solidarity with the Hunger Strikers a decade earlier.

Spokespersons of the Irish community and some others repeatedly warned the British Left, social-democratic and liberal sections of society that if they allowed the PTA to be used temporarily against the Irish community, it would become permanent; and if they allowed it against the Irish community it would be used against others later.  In 1991, an article published by conservative British newspaper The Telegraph complained that the police were using “anti-terror” legislation against people who were clearly political protesters; the article cited 1,000 anti-war demonstrators including an 11-year-old child at Aldermaston and 600 protesters at a Labour Party Conference, including an 84-year-old man, all of whom had been questioned under “anti-terror” legislation (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/personal-view/3620110/The-police-must-end-their-abuse-of-anti-terror-legislation.html?fb).  Since then, Muslim communities have also complained about the way in which “anti-terror” is used against them, in violation of their civil and human rights.

Repressive legislation labelled “anti-terror” in Britain since the 1970s began with the PTA and detention for five days, then for seven; subsequent legislation authorised it for 14 days; an attempt was made to extend it to three months on police recommendation but failed in Parliament; however the Terrorism Act 2006 authorises 28 days detention without charge.

Not “miscarriages of justice” but exercise in mass intimidation

The convictions and jailing of innocent Irish people were not “miscarriages of justice” but rather an exercise in the mass intimidation and coercion of the Irish community in Britain by the British state. The jailing of six innocent men for murder in 1975, who would have been hung were the death sentence for murder still on the statutes, was part of a campaign of terror against the Irish community in Britain which included the Prevention of Terrorism (sic) Act in 1974 and the convictions of Judith Ward (1974), the Maguire Seven (1975) and Guildford Four (1975).

As remarked earlier, the Irish community in Britain was the largest and longest-established ethnic minority in Britain; it was and had long been a source of solidarity to the struggle in Ireland.  It had also contributed significantly to the British Left and the struggle for socialism in the past:  Bronterre O’Brien and Feargus O’Connor were renowned leaders of the Chartists in the 1840s and 1850s, The Red Flag was written by Jim Connell in 1889, The Ragged-Trousered Philanthropists was written by Robert Tressell (real name Noonan) in 1914, the Irish were to the fore in the Battle of Cable Street in 1936 and so on.

Chartist demo

Artist’s illustration of Chartist demonstration in Britain. The largest-ever popular political movement of the working class in Britain, two of its leaders were Irish.

The British police had a long hostile relationship with the Irish diaspora, both because of the social position and conditions of the majority of the Irish community but also due to the Irish diaspora’s support for the struggle “back home”.  Scotland Yard set up “The Irish Special Branch” to gather intelligence on pro-Fenian activity in the Irish communities in the cities in British cities during the later 19th Century — it was later renamed simply “the Special Branch”, as they are (politely) known today in Britain, the Six Counties and in the Twenty-Six.

Irish communities could be insular in some places and Irish “ghettos” existed: among “The Rookeries” in London (several areas around the city centre) and Wapping, “Little Ireland” in Manchester and so on.  But the community also had a high impact on the British working class, particularly in England and in Scotland but also in Wales (the SW Miners’ Federation originally featured Connolly’s image on their banner, alongside those of Lenin and Kier Hardie).  The Irish community were ideally placed to call for solidarity for the anti-imperialist struggle in the Six Counties and to counter British media disinformation and censorship.  In most places, Irish worked alongside British workers, married among them, followed sports teams and also played sports with them.  In many places they also lived in the same streets or housing blocks.

The British ruling class realised the potential of the Irish diaspora in Britain even if the Provisionals seemed not to.  When ordinary repression — surveillance, questioning, agents provocateurs, spies and informers, arrests and occasional police charges into demonstrations, along with a hostile media campaign — did not work, something stronger was needed.  Very repressive legislation, a high level of arrests, thousands of detentions and jailing of 18 (there were a few other cases too) innocent people in four different high-visibility trials might work instead.  Especially if allied to some atrocity with which most Irish people could not agree, so that they felt morally undermined too.  For a while, with the combination of the Birmingham Pub Bombing, the framing for murder of innocents and the Prevention of Terrorism, largely this approach did work, with most of the Left running for cover and most of the Irish community keeping their heads down.

Many, many people in the Irish community in Britain knew for certain that the Maguire Seven, Guildford Four and Judith Ward were not IRA and could not be: the Guildford Four were living in a squat, taking drugs and engaging in petty crime and Judith Ward had been mentally ill and had accosted police to claim responsibility for a bombing.  The Maguire Seven were a family including two minors, a family friend and a relative, Giuseppe, who had travelled over from the Six Counties to support his son Gerry of the Guildford Four.   The feeling that the Birmingham Six were innocent too quickly gained momentum. But for the British authorities, it was actually GOOD that the Irish community knew they were innocent because, if innocent people can go to jail for murder, everyone is vulnerable and the only possible way to safety would be to keep one’s head down and one’s mouth shut.

This was the period in which the Troops Out Movement (TOM), initially founded to bring Irish solidarity into the broad British society, the Left and trade unions, largely abandoned that task and began instead to concentrate on the Irish community.  In that pool were now swimming Irish Republican political activists, the IBRG, TOM, some British Left and, in some places the Connolly Association.

Hunger Strike solidarity Britain

One of many Hunger Strikers solidarity march in Britain 1981. The effort to save the ten brought the Irish and some of the British Left out on to the streets, effectively breaking the terror grip of the Prevention of Terrorism (sic) Act and the jailing in separate murder trials of an innocent score of Irish people.

It was the Hunger Strikes of 1981 that broke the stranglehold of repression and fear on the Irish community and brought them out on to the streets again, in solidarity with prisoners and trying to save the Hunger Strikers’ lives.  And after a columnist in The Irish Post noted that Bobby Sands had died during the AGM of the Federation of Irish Societies in Britain and not one word from the top table had marked his passing, not even in condolences to Sands’ family, it also led to the founding of the Irish in Britain Representation Group, a broad organisation campaigning on a wide range of issues, from anti-Irish racism in the media to framed Irish prisoners, from a fair share of resources from local authorities to self-determination for the Irish people in Ireland.

Irish solidarity work enjoyed a resurgence for the next decade and longer but external influences began to affect the work and divisions arose as the long road to the Good Friday Agreement in Ireland began to pull and push against different elements in the solidarity movement in Britain.  But that’s another story.

End.

¿CÓMO PUEDE UN PUEBLO DERROTAR A UN INVASOR MÁS FUERTE O A UNA POTENCIA OCUPANTE?

Diarmuid Breatnach

Noviembre de 2012 (ligeramente revisado enero 2014)

(Originalmente in inglés y traducido por

Miguel Huertas)

PRESENTACIÓN

La pregunta de cómo una nación sería capaz de derrotar a una potencia imperialista o colonial más fuerte que ha invadido su territorio ha ocupado la mente de muchos revolucionarios – principalmente demócratas patriotas (en Irlanda, “republicanos”) y socialistas. La Historia mundial nos muestra algunas victorias en esta lucha, como la de los vietnamitas contra EEUU. No obstante, también muestra victorias parciales, en las que el poder colonial fue forzado a retirarse pero los nuevos gobernantes del país entregan la independencia que ya tenían en sus manos y se convierten en clientes del antiguo poder colonial o en una nueva potencia imperialista.

La historia de la lucha por el socialismo y la de liberación nacional, separada pero conectada de numerosas maneras, nos a entregado muchos ejemplos de los que extraer lecciones generales que puedan ser aplicadas a las luchas de la misma naturaleza en el presente, el pasado, y el futuro.

 

VIETNAM

Los vietnamitas tenían a los franceses prácticamente derrotados cuando fueron invadidos por los japoneses, quienes al perder la Segunda Guerra Mundial tuvieron que devolver la mitad del territorio a los franceses, que a su vez se lo entregaron a EEUU, la nueva superpotencia imperialista que había emergido de la Guerra.

Los vietnamitas, en un país que es más pequeño que el Estado de Virginia, combatieron contra EEUU durante otros veinte años, sufriendo tremendos daños y finalmente derrotándoles. Estados Unidos contaba con el ejército mejor equipado del mundo, con la economía más poderosa y una tecnología en constante desarrollo, con una gran población de la que movilizar soldados y un gran presupuesto militar. Y aun así los vietnamitas vencieron.

Vietnamese guerrillas -- the guerilla forces and the North Vietnamese Army together defeated the huge superpower the USA

Guerrilleras vietnamitas — las fuerzas guerilleras y el Ejército Norte Vietnames juntos derrotaron a la gran superpotencia los EEUU.

Por supuesto que estaban luchando por su tierra natal, por supuesto que eran valientes, inteligentes y se adaptaban. Pero esas virtudes, por sí solas, podrían no haber sido suficientes. Tenían otros factores a su favor. Ya tenían liberado la mitad del país (Vietnam del Norte), y EEUU no podía invadir ese territorio sin arriesgarse a que China o incluso la Unión Soviética entrasen en conflicto directo con ellos. Esa parte del país permaneció durante muchos años como una retaguardia segura para los vietnamitas que combatían en las filas de la guerrilla del Viet Cong, y para los soldados regulares del Ejército de Vietnam del Norte, de quienes podían conseguir armas y otros materiales.

En el área de las relaciones internacionales, los vietnamitas tenían el respaldo de la República Popular de China, que podía aprovisionar les con armas y equipo.

En política internacional, todas las fuerzas anti-imperialistas les apoyaron, aislando a EE.UU. políticamente. Ese hecho, combinado con la tasa de mortalidad de los soldados estadounidenses junto con la progresiva radicalización de la juventud, creó un poderoso movimiento contra la guerra imperialista dentro de los propios Estados Unidos que jugó un papel importante minando la moral del personal militar de EEUU destinado en Vietnam.

A powerful movement of opposition to the Vietnam War within the USA itself

Un movimiento potente de oposición a la Guerra de Vietnam dentro del mismo EE.UU.

Los vietnamitas también tenían el apoyo del régimen laosiano y de potentes fuerzas anti-imperialistas en Camboya, quienes proporcionaban pertrechos y rutas de escape alternativas para la guerrilla vietnamita.

El territorio de Vietnam es montañoso, con valles y planicies cubiertas de junglas y arboledas de bambú o con “pasto elefante”, una hierba de altura superior a una persona. Escondía perfectamente a la guerrilla y a unidades regulares del ejército.

Vietnamese liberation forces tank crashes through the gates of the US Embassy in Saigon as liberation forces take the city from the US puppet regime after US forces left

Tanque de las fuerzas de liberación vietnamitas rompe la puerta de la Embajada de los EE.UU. en Saigon tras las fuerzas de liberación tomar la ciudad desde el régimen títere de EE.UU. después de que las fuerzas estadounidenses se fueron

Y, quizá crucialmente, el monopolio capitalista de EE.UU. podía permitirse perder la parte sur del Vietnam – no estaba integrado en su territorio, ni siquiera en su “patio trasero” (como suelen pensar de América Latina). La pérdida les costó prestigio, algo importante para una superpotencia mundial, así como moral en su propio país. Su clase dominante estaba decidida a no perder, y combatieron duramente para ganar, pero las consecuencias políticas y las bajas eran tan elevadas que otro sector de esa clase optaba por abandonar. Ése es el verdadero motivo del escándalo Watergate y de la acusación del presidente Nixon.

 

IRLANDA

Irlanda ya no es un país boscoso, y tiene muchas más zonas urbanizadas que Vietnam; no tiene una zona liberada que le sirva de apoyo (el Estado de los 26 condados o “República de Irlanda” es hostil a cualquier movimiento anti-imperialista en su territorio), ni tiene países vecinos que quieran prestar ayuda o hacer la vista gorda ante el uso de su territorio. Tampoco tiene un buen proveedor de armamento (en realidad, el único fue brevemente la Libia de Gadafi). Además, no sólo Irlanda es considerada el “patio trasero” de Gran Bretaña, sino que la isla entera ha sido considerada como un parte integral del “Reino Unido”, la base del monopolio capitalista británico.

Pero ha habido y hay otros factores que el movimiento anti-imperialista irlandés puede usar en su favor, que serán examinados aquí en el contexto de las luchas anti-imperialistas del país en el último siglo.

Primero sería útil echar un vistazo a un breve resumen histórico de las luchas irlandesas contra el colonialismo y el imperialismo pero, por ser caso que el lector ya conocía bien esa historia, lo hemos puesto en apéndice al final.

¿Cuáles fueron las opciones de las fuerzas irlandesas de liberación nacional en algunos momentos del siglo pasado?

Siempre es más fácil juzgar a los actores y las acciones del pasado, pero es necesario hacerlo para permitir que las acciones pasadas nos enseñen a la hora de llevar a cabo las acciones del presente y del futuro. Las examinadas aquí son las opciones, elecciones, y consecuencias, del

  • Alzamiento de Pascua de 1916,

  • y la Guerra guerrillera de La Independencia de 1919-1921

  • y la guerra de 30 años 1971-1998.

El Alzamiento de Pascuas 1916

En 1914 había empezado la Primera Guerra Mundial imperialista, y para 1915 la escala de la matanza era enorme. Los socialistas revolucionarios (en oposición a los partidos socialdemócratas que habían elegido apoyar a sus burguesías nacionales), querían una insurrección que detuviera la carnicería y también brindara una oportunidad a la revolución socialista – en este sector se encontraban James Connolly y el Partido Socialista Republicano Irlandés, que colocaron en la azotea del edificio de su sindicato una enorme pancarta que rezaba: ¡NI REY NI KAISER!

También 1914 era un año después de que el Sindicato Irlandés de Transportes y Trabajadores Generales, una escisión de un sindicato británico, tratase de romper el cierre patronal de Dublín durante ocho meses. Durante ese cierre patronal, el sindicato había formado su propia milicia –el Ejército Ciudadano Irlandés– para defenderse de los violentos ataques de la policía, y tal organización continuó existiendo pese al fin del cierre patronal.

Los nacionalistas revolucionarios demócratas, es decir republicanos, también vieron la oportunidad de luchar por la libertad mientras el ocupante colonial-imperialista estaba luchando contra otras potencias imperialistas. También pensaron que aquellas naciones que hubiesen ganado su independencia o al menos demostrado con fuerza su deseo de ser independientes verían su derecho de autodeterminación ratificado por las potencias emergentes tras la Guerra.

Los nacionalistas constitucionales, por otro lado, la mayoría se apresuraron a mostrar su apoyo por sus amos coloniales y, en el caso de Irlanda, reclutaron a sus compañeros para que se unieran a la carnicería de los campos de batalla.

En Irlanda, la sociedad secreta revolucionaria Hermandad Republicana Irlandesa y las organizaciones de los Voluntarios Irlandeses (que los anteriores controlaban tras la escisión de los Voluntarios Nacionales Irlandeses, de cual muchos se unieron al ejército británico), junto con la organización de mujeres Cumann na mBan y la organización juvenil Na Fianna Éireann, unieron sus fuerzas a la del Ejército Ciudadano (según Lenin, dicen: “El primer Ejército Rojo de Europa”) en una insurrección armada contra el dominio británico. Principalmente tuvo lugar en Dublín en 1916 y duró una semana. Después de que los rebeldes se rindieran ante las superiores fuerzas británicas, la mayoría fueron enviados a campos de concentración junto con otros que fueron arrestados y condenados sin juicio. Casi todos los líderes del Alzamiento fueron ejecutados por pelotones de fusilamiento.

Planes para el Alzamiento

Hubo ciertos elementos en el plan del Alzamiento que merece la pena considerar. La insurrección había sido planeada en secreto, no sólo de cara a las autoridades, sino también de cara a ciertos líderes de los Voluntarios Irlandeses, incluido su comandante. Estaba planeado para ser una insurrección a nivel nacional, y también se había contado con que la Alemania Imperial, en guerra con el Imperio Británico, aprovisionara al levantamiento con armas y municiones.

La primera parte del plan en fallar fue la dificultad de encontrarse, por cambio de destino, con el buque alemán para coger las armas y llevarlas a tierra firme, y su posterior descubrimiento por parte de los británicos, resultando en la captura de la tripulación (después de hundir el barco) y de Roger Casement, el agente de los Voluntarios Irlandeses que viajaba con ellos.

Lo segundo en desmoronarse fue el secretismo interno y que, cuando el comandante de los Voluntarios Irlandeses supo del Alzamiento y del fracaso al obtener las armas alemanas, canceló las “ marchas y maniobras ” planeadas para el Domingo de Pascua, que eran el código para la movilización de los rebeldes. El Alzamiento comenzó en el Lunes de Pascua, pero tan sólo con un millar de hombres y mujeres movilizados en Dublín, muchos menos efectivos en los condados Meath, Galway y Wexford y sin comunicación entre esas fuerzas a excepción del mensajero, un proceso que tardaba días.

En Dublín, las fuerzas rebeldes fueron desplegadas débilmente y no fueron capaces de tomar ciertos edificios importantes, como el Castillo de Dublín, sede del poder colonial desde la invasión de los normandos (que además tenía en su interior a los dos oficiales británicos más importantes destinados en Irlanda), y el Trinity College, que establecía el canon para la altura de los edificios y desde cuya azotea los francotiradores británicos hostigaban a los insurgentes, matando a algunos de ellos (a parecer, la toma de este edificio no era parte del plan original).

El plan original del Alzamiento ha sido analizado por varias autoridades –algunas de ellas militares, y se ha debatido sobre él largo y tendido.

Sin embargo, una movilización de efectivos que puede ser cancelada o muy debilitada por una sola persona, que además no es parte del plan pero puede suponerse que se enterará tarde o temprano, es una debilidad monumental. Si tal acuerdo es contemplado, al menos se debe tener un plan alternativo en caso de que esa persona decida echar abajo la operación, y que cuente además con líneas de comunicación rápida entre las diversas unidades que se quieren movilizar.

Otra debilidad del plan es no haber bloqueado el río Liffey (por ejemplo, hundiendo barcos en él), lo que permitió a un acorazado británico navegar cauce arriba y bombardear la ciudad. Se dice que James Connolly, comandante del Ejército Ciudadano, había pensado que los británicos no llegarían a los extremos de destruir propiedades capitalistas. Esto no fue finalmente un factor fundamental, pues los británicos emplearon también otros cañones para atacar Dublín… pero podría haberlo sido.

También parece que no hubo planes para la destrucción de puentes o vías de ferrocarril, probablemente debido a que se había contado con esas vías de comunicación en el plan original de movilización de los insurgentes.

¿Podría haber sucedido?

Pero incluso contando con estos elementos y con una supuesta movilización total de efectivos, ¿qué probabilidades de éxito tenía el Alzamiento? Irlanda es una isla, y la superioridad naval de las fuerzas británicas hubiese permitido que desembarcasen tropas a voluntad en prácticamente cualquier lugar, aunque es cierto que en ese momento el Imperio Británico estaba combatiendo a otras potencias imperialistas y había comprometido la mayor parte de sus efectivos en esa lucha. Pero, ¿es probable que estuviesen dispuestos a sacrificar una posesión tan cercana a su tierra natal, que es una parte misma del Reino Unido, y además tan cerca de su flanco occidental? ¿No es más probable que hubiesen decidido perder un territorio más alejado?

Lo más seguro es que, en el caso de haberse dado un alzamiento exitoso en la mayor parte de Irlanda, los británicos hubiesen respondido con el desembarco de tropas en varios lugares del territorio y, aunque sin duda tras cruentos combates, hubiesen tomado todas las ciudades controladas por los insurgentes. Hubiesen salido victoriosos porque eran superiores numéricamente, en armamento, en entrenamiento, y en poder naval y aéreo (de los cuales los insurgentes carecían por completo), y porque hubiesen estado combatiendo en una guerra convencional en la cual estos elementos son cruciales.

Después, se hubiesen desplazado de esas ciudades insurgentes al medio rural de los alrededores para eliminar a las unidades rebeldes aún en activo. En ese tipo de operaciones hubiesen tenido el apoyo de la policía y las fuerzas armadas cuartelizadas allí que no hubiesen sido capturadas por los insurgentes, y de las milicias lealistas (de número substancial en la parte norte del país). El control británico de los mares hubiese prevenido que los insurgentes irlandeses se beneficiasen de cualquier ayuda extranjera.

El coste para los británicos hubiese sido elevado: tanto en la ventaja que hubiesen tenido sus enemigos en la guerra como en consecuencias políticas y quizá en la moral de sus propias tropas. ¿Pero quién puede dudar que se hubiesen arriesgado a todo ello?

O'Connell St (then Sackvill St) from the Bridge looking north-eastwards.  Destruction by bombardment of a major UK city shows determination of the British to crush the Rising.

La calle O’Connell (entonces la de Sackville) desde el Puente mirando hacia el noreste. La destrucción por bombardeo del centro de una mayor ciudad del Reino Unido (como lo era entonces) muestra la determinación por los británicos de aplastar el Alzamiento.

Incluso podrían simplemente haber tomado las ciudades en manos de los insurgentes y haber asegurado que el norte del país permanecía leal hasta después de la guerra, y entonces haberse ocupado de los insurgentes que quedasen con más tranquilidad.

Lo que realmente ocurrió, como sabemos, fue que el Alzamiento fue derrotado en una semana, se declaró la ley marcial, los principales líderes fueron ejecutados, y se produjeron subsiguientes redadaspor todo el país, así como arrestos e prisión sin juicio.

La Guerra de la Independencia y el alejamiento de los objetivos marcados

Tres años más tarde, los nacionalistas revolucionarios volvieron a la lucha armada, esta vez sin milicias obreras ni un liderazgo socialista efectivo como aliados, y comenzaron una estrategia de lucha política combinada después con ataques de guerrilla en zonas rurales que pronto se extendieron a ciertas zonas urbanas (principalmente las ciudades de Dublín y de Cork).

La lucha política movilizó a miles de personas y también resultó en una mayoría absoluta en Irlanda de su partido en las elecciones generales (en Reino Unido, del que Irlanda era parte). La lucha en Irlanda y la respuesta británica estaba generando mucho interés y comentarios críticos en círculos políticos, intelectuales y artísticos de la propia Gran Bretaña. Además, por el mundo, muchos revolucionarios, socialistas y nacionalistas, estaban obteniendo inspiración de esa lucha anti colonial tan feroz, que tenía lugar tan cerca de Inglaterra, dentro del propio Reino Unido.

El desmantelamiento por parte de las fuerzas nacionalistas, mediante amenazas y acciones armadas, de la red de control de la policía colonial británica, que consecuentemente también desmanteló la mayoría del servicio de Inteligencia de contra insurrección, llevó a los británicos a formar dos nuevos cuerpos especiales que ayudasen a combatir la insurrección irlandesa. Estas dos fuerzas se ganaron a pulso una siniestra reputación, no sólo entre los nacionalistas sino también entre los lealistas pro-británicos.

Estas fuerzas especiales de paramilitares policiales recurrieron cada vez más y más a la tortura, el asesinato y el incendio provocado pero, no obstante, en ciertas zonas de Irlanda como Dublín, Kerry y Cork, tuvieron que ser reforzados con soldados británicos regulares dado que no eran capaces de combatir de forma efectiva a los insurgentes, que se volvían más confiados, más decididos y más experimentados cada semana que pasaba.

Sin embargo, dos años después del comienzo de la guerra de guerrillas, una mayoría dentro del liderazgo del movimiento nacionalista revolucionario apostó por la partición del país, con cierta independencia para una de las partes, siempre dentro de la Mancomunidad Británica de Naciones (Commonwealth).

Se ha debatido mucho acerca de los eventos que condujeron a este momento. Se suele decir que el Primer Ministro británico Lloyd George chantajeó a la delegación diplomática irlandesa con la amenaza de “una guerra terrible y total” si no aceptaban el acuerdo. La delegación fue forzada a responder a la propuesta sin tener la posibilidad de consultar a sus camaradas.

Algunos dicen que el Presidente del partido político nacionalista, Éamonn de Valera, envió a un delegado sin experiencia política, Michael Collins, sabiendo que acabaría aceptando un mal trato, del cual De Valera pudiese distanciarse.

Michael Collins, encargado del abastecimiento de las guerrillas, dijo posteriormente que les quedaban sólo unos pocos cargadores más para cada combatiente, y que el IRA, el ejército guerrillero, no podría combatir en el tipo de guerra con la que amenazaba Lloyd George. También dijo que ese Tratado era un paso adelante en la total independencia de Irlanda en un futuro próximo.

Ninguna de esas razones me parecen convincentes.

¿Cómo pudo el liderazgo de un movimiento en el punto álgido de su éxito derrumbarse de ese modo?

Desde luego, los británicos amenazaban con una guerra más dura, pero ya habían hecho amenazas antes, y el pueblo irlandés las había enfrentado sin miedo. Si el IRA se encontraba en tal difícil situación con respecto a las municiones (no estoy seguro de que exista ninguna prueba de ello aparte de la afirmación de Collins), hubiese sido una razón válida para reducir la actividad militar, no para retirarse y aceptar un Tratado cuando estaban tan cerca de conseguir aquello por lo que estaban luchando. El IRA era, después de todo, una guerrilla de combatientes voluntarios, la mayoría de ellos a tiempo parcial. Podría haberse retirado de las operaciones ofensivas y muchos de sus luchadores haberse mezclado con la población o, de ser necesario, haberse “dado a la fuga”.

Si la situación de los suministros militares de los nacionalistas irlandeses era tan terrible de cara al mejor equipo y experiencia de los soldados británicos, ¿realmente es eso lo único a tener en cuenta? Un ejército necesita más que armas y municiones para ir a la guerra, sino que hay otros factores que afectan a su habilidad y efectividad.

La situación precaria de los británicos

En 1919, al final de la Guerra, los británicos, aunque eran la parte victoriosa, estaban en una situación precaria. Durante la misma guerra había habido graves motines en el ejército (durante los cuales los oficiales y suboficiales habían muerto a manos de sus soldados), y cuando los soldados fueron desmovilizados de vuelta a la vida civil y sus viejas condiciones de vida, había una extendida insatisfacción. Las huelgas en la industria habían sido prohibidas durante la Guerra (aunque algunas se habían producido igualmente), y un movimiento de huela estaba ahora en marcha.

En 1918 y nuevamente en 1919, la policía se puso en huelga. También en 1919, los trabajadores del ferrocarril hicieron huelga, al igual que otros sectores, en una oleada que se llevaba organizando desde el año anterior. En 1918 las huelgas ya habían costado 6 millones en días laborales. Esta cifra se elevó a 35 millones de pérdidas en 1919, con una suma diaria de aproximadamente cien mil trabajadores en huelga.

Glasgow presenció en 1921 una huelga con piquetes de 6.000 personas que combatieron a la policía. La unidad local del ejército británico fue encerrada en sus cuarteles por sus propios oficiales, y unidades especiales armadas con ametralladoras, tanques y un obús, fueron movilizadas desde otras partes del país.

James Wolfe, en su trabajo ‘Motines en las Fuerzas Armadas Estados Unidienses y Británicas en el siglo XX’(Mutiny in United States and British Armed forces in the Twentieth Centuryhttp://www.mellenpress.com/mellenpress.cfm?bookid=8271&pc=9), incluye los títulos de los siguientes capítulos:

Workers pass an overturned tram during in Hackney, NE London, during the 1926 British General Strike.  In general, goods travelled through Britain with authorisation from the workers or under police and troop protection.

Trabajadores pasan un tranvía rompehuelgas volcado en Hackney, Londres NE, durante la Huelga General 1926. Por muchas partes, los bienes viajaron a través de Gran Bretaña con la autorización de los trabajadores o bajo escolta de protección policial o militar.

 

4.2 Los motines en el ejército en Enero/Febrero de 1919

4.3 El motín de ‘Val de Lievre’.

4.4 Tres motines en la Royal Air Force (Fuerza Aérea Real), Enero de 1919.

4.5 Motines en la Marina Real — Rusia, Febrero a Junio de 1919.

4.6 Los motines navales de 1919.

4.7 Disturbios de desmovilización 1918/1919.

4.8 Los disturbios del campamento de Kinmel Park 1919

4.9 “No es un país para héroes” – los disturbios de los veteranos en Luton.

4.10 El descontento en curso –Mediados de 1919 a Fin de Año.

El Gobierno británico temía que su policía fuese insuficiente a la hora de reprimir a los trabajadores, y preocupado sobre la confianza en su ejército si era usado de esa manera.

Ya se habían producido manifestaciones, disturbios y motines en las Fuerzas Armadas acerca de los retrasos en la desmovilización (y también en protesta al ser enviados a combatir la Revolución Bolchevique en Rusia).

Los demás lugares del Imperio Británico eran también inestables. Los árabes estaban enfurecidos ante la negativa británica de darle la libertad, tal y como habían prometido, a cambio de combatir a los turcos, y las rebeliones estallarían y se continuarían a lo largo de los siguientes años.

Los británicos también se estaban enfrentando al descontento en Palestina al estar re ubicando allí a judíos que habían comprado tierra árabe. Una rebelión contra los británicos tuvo lugar en Mesopotamia (actual Iraq) en 1918 y de nuevo en 1919. La Tercera Guerra Afgana se produjo en 1919; Ghandi y sus seguidores comenzaron su campaña de desobediencia civil en 1919 mientras que en la región Malabar de la India se levantó en armas contra el dominio británico en 1921.

Comunicados secretos (pero ahora accesibles) entre Winston Churchill, Lloyd George, y el Jefe del Estado Mayor de las Fuerzas Armadas Británicas revelan serias preocupaciones acerca de la capacidad y disposición de sus soldados a la hora de reprimir futuras insurrecciones y acciones en la industria en Gran Bretaña e incluso, si los soldados en servicio activo demandaban su desmovilización, si tendrían suficientes soldados a lo largo del Imperio para enfrentarse a las tareas que tendrían que enfrentar.

Los nacionalistas revolucionarios irlandeses estaban en una posición muy fuerte para continuar su lucha hasta ganar su independencia, e incluso para ser catalizadores de una revolución socialista en Gran Bretaña y la muerte del Imperio. Pero retrocedieron, dándole al Imperio el respiro que necesitaba para ocuparse de las ascuas de rebelión en otros lugares y para prepararse para el enfrentamiento con los militantes sindicalistas británicos durante la Huelga General de 1926.

Así, los partidarios del Tratado volvieron sus armas contra aquellos que habían sido sus camaradas en una cruel Guerra Civil que comenzó en 1922. El nuevo Estado ejecutaba a los prisioneros del IRA (incluso a algunos sin juicio) y la represión continuó con dureza incluso cuando ya habían derrotado al IRA en la Guerra Civil.

Si los nacionalistas revolucionarios irlandeses no tenían conocimiento de todos los problemas a los que se enfrentaba el Imperio Británico, sí que conocían muchos de ellos. La huelga de hambre en 1920 de McSwiney, el Alcalde de Cork, había captado la atención internacional, y los nacionalistas indios se habían puesto en contacto con la familia de McSwiney. La presencia de enormes comunidades de trabajadores irlandeses en Gran Bretaña, de Londres a Glasgow, daban la oportunidad de mantenerse al día de los conflictos industriales, incluso si a los nacionalistas irlandeses no les importaba establecer lazos de unión con los sindicalistas británicos. Sylvia Pankhurst, de una importante familia de sufragistas y una revolucionaria comunista, publicaba cartas en ‘El Trabajador Irlandés’ (The Irish Worker), el periódico del Sindicato Irlandés de Transportes y Trabajadores Generales (IT&GWU- Irish Transport & General Workers’ Union).

La presencia de un número importante de irlandeses todavía dentro del ejército británico también era una fuente de información.

Anti-Treaty cartoon, 1921, depicts Ireland being coerced by Michael Collins, representing the Free State Army, along with the Catholic Church, in the service of British Imperialism

Dibujo de la Lucha contra el Tratado de 1921, representa a Irlanda siendo coaccionado por Michael Collins, en representación del Ejército del Estado Libre, junto con la Iglesia Católica, al servicio del imperialismo británico

La mayoría de los líderes del movimiento nacionalista revolucionario irlandés tenían un trasfondo pequeño-burgués y no tenían un programa de expropiación de industriales y grandes terratenientes. No buscaban representar los intereses del pueblo trabajador irlandés, e incluso algunas veces le demostraron hostilidad, impidiendo que campesinos sin tierra se estableciesen en grandes fincas y se dividiesen después el terreno. Históricamente, la pequeña burguesía se ha mostrado incapaz de compaginar una revolución con sus propios intereses como clase, y en Irlanda era inevitable que los nacionalistas acabasen siguiendo los intereses de la burguesía irlandesa. Los socialistas irlandeses eran demasiado pocos y débiles como para ofrecer un bando alternativo. La burguesía irlandesa había sido revolucionaria por última vez en 1798, y no iba a cambiar en ese momento. Originalmente, junto a una Iglesia Católica con la que tenían muchos intereses en común, se habían negado a apoyar al nacionalismo revolucionario pero decidieron unir fuerzas con él cuando vieron que había una posibilidad de mejorar su posición, y también cuando parecía que la derrota de los británicos era inminente.

Ante estas evidentes posibilidades es difícil evitar la conclusión de que el sector del nacionalismo revolucionario irlandés que optó por el Tratado ofrecido por Lloyd George, lo hizo debido a que lo preferían a las alternativas. Prefirieron rendirse a cambio de un solo pedazo en lugar de luchar por todo el pastel. Y la burguesía irlandesa se beneficiaría del Tratado, a diferencia de la mayoría del pueblo irlandés. Las frase de James Connolly que decía que la clase obrera era la “incorruptible heredera”

Troops of the new Irish government use British-lent cannon to shell Republican HQ in the Four Courts in 1922, starting the Civil War.

Las tropas del nuevo gobierno irlandés usan cañón prestado por los británicos para bombardear la sede republicana en los Four Courts (Cuatro Juzgados) en 1922, iniciando la Guerra Civil.

 de la lucha irlandesa por la libertad tuvo un corolario: que la burguesía irlandesa siempre comprometería la lucha. También es posible que la alternativa que la burguesía nacionalista temía no era tanto la “guerra terrible y total” británica, sino la posibilidad de una revolución social en la que perderían todos sus privilegios.

El siguiente reto al Imperio por parte del nacionalismo revolucionario no ocurriría hasta cincuenta años más tarde, y tendría lugar principalmente en los Seis Condados ocupados.

La guerra de treinta años en los Seis Condados

El IRA no tuvo mucho éxito en la serie de cortas campañas que llevaron a cabo durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial o durante los años cincuenta. El Sinn Féin, su partido político, sufrió una importante escisión durante los años treinta, y la nueva organización, Fianna Fáil, que optó por un camino puramente constitucionalista, pronto se convirtió en uno de los principales partidos burgueses del nuevo Estado irlandés. Este partido estuvo en el poder durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial, y sintió que su posición de neutralidad sería debilitada por la actividad del IRA contra los británicos. Llevó a cabo redadas contra sus propios camaradas, encarceló a cientos de ellos en unas condiciones penosas, les propinó palizas en las que algunos murieron, así como ejecutó a muchos otros.

El Sinn Féin se reformó en los sesenta, revocó su prohibición de posturas comunistas y aparentemente comenzó a desarrollar un punto de vista socialista; también comenzó a preocuparse por asuntos sociales dentro del Estado irlandés y realizó agitación sobre cuestiones como la vivienda. Además, llevó a cabo campañas de desobediencia civil y de traspaso de la propiedad privada de terratenientes extranjeros que poseían viviendas, tierras y ríos sobre suelo irlandés.

En los Seis Condados, el partido contribuyó a la organización del movimiento de protesta por los derechos civiles, pero pronto éste les sobrepasó. Después de que la policía arrasase esas áreas y matase a tiros a un miembro de la comunidad (irónicamente, una persona de la localidad que era soldado británico y que estaba de vacaciones), las comunidades católicas de Derry y Falls Road (Belfast) levantaron barricadas para impedir el paso de la policía, y en Derry fueron capaces de defender las con éxito contra los repetidos ataques de la policía paramilitar, sus reservas a tiempo parcial, y de las turbas lealistas.

Escisión!

Entonces, cuando necesitaron armas, los republicanos del norte descubrieron que el liderazgo en Dublín había dispuesto de ellas (supuestamente las había vendido a un grupo armado galés), y que lo único que tenían para defender sus zonas era un puñado de armas (y sólo una de las cuales era automática). Esto llevó a una escisión en el partido y en el IRA, llamándose las nuevas organizaciones Sinn Féin Provisional e IRA Provisional. La organización original añadió la palabra “Oficial” tanto a su ala política como a su grupo armado. Los escindidos rápidamente pasaron a ser conocidos como “los provisionales” (o “Provos” o “Provies”). Más tarde los Oficiales pasaron a ser conocidos como “los Pegajosos” (o “Stickies”), debido a una desafortunada innovación que les llevó a hacer sus propios lirios de pascua (flor que simboliza el Alzamiento de Pascua de 1916) con papel y pegamento en la parte de atrás (los otros siguieron sujetando con pin, como antes).

Los Provisionales no tenían tolerancia para el socialismo. Muchos de ellos sentían que había sido la ideología socialista la que les había llevado a estar prácticamente desarmados cuando sus zonas estaban bajo ataque. Reiteraron la clásica queja de los soldados sobre “demasiada política”. Además, entre sus dirigentes no había pocos católicos de ideología conservadora. En su frente internacional, más bien escaso, Fred Burns O’Brien, un estadounidense de origen irlandés y republicano pero también sionista, durante un tiempo publicó en el periódico de Sinn Féin An Phoblacht una columna en la que de vez en cuando ensalzaba el ejemplo sionista. Una carta de protesta de un lector que expresaba que los aliados naturales de los irlandeses eran los palestinos y no los sionistas no fue publicada, y O’Brien continuó escribiendo su columna en An Phoblacht durante algún tiempo más.

Los Provisionales se enfrentaron con el Ejército Británico cuando fue enviado a apoyar al Estado colonial contra los levantamientos populares cuando la policía colonial se mostró incapaz de reprimirlos. Pronto estuvieron combatiendo fundamentalmente con los soldados del Ejército Británico, la policía armada colonial, y los escuadrones de la muerte clandestinos de ambas unidades. Además, aunque en menor medida, también combatieron con los paramilitares lealistas, que mayoritariamente concentraban sus ataques de forma aleatoria en personas de origen católico.

Nuevo liderazgo de los Provisionales

Gradualmente, una nueva hornada de dirigentes comenzó a formarse entre las filas de los Provisionales. Los viejos dirigentes habían quedado desacreditados, Mac Stiofáin por ser capturado con papeles incriminatorios, y después empezar una huelga de hambre hasta la muerte que abandonó al poco de empezar. El liderazgo de Ó Brádaigh perdió cierta credibilidad debido a su declaración de que, primero 1972 y después 1973, iba a ser Bliain an Bhua, el Año de la Victoria (por supuesto, ninguno lo fue). También bajo su liderazgo se produjo el alto fuego y tregua de 1975, de los cuales los Provos no sacaron beneficio alguno cuando los británicos rompieron la tregua y atacaron medidas aún más represivas que las anteriores; además, los posibles beneficios propagandísticos no estaban preparados y no se produjeron. “Moss” Twomey, Jefe del Estado Mayor del IRA y uno de los líderes originales de los Provisionales, no apoyó la tregua pero fue cesado de su cargo debido a su arresto en 1977 por parte de la Garda (Policía) en los 26 Condados.

Ruairí Ó Brádaigh and Gerry Adams, solidarity conference London 1983.  Adams ousted Ó Brádaigh in the Provos' leadership.  Ó Brádaigh was twice chief of staff of the IRA between 1958 and 1962, president of Provisional Sinn Fein from 1970 to 1983 and of Republican Sinn Fein from 1987 to 2009,

Ruairí Ó Brádaigh y Gerry Adams, conferencia de solidaridad de Londres 1983. Adams derrocó a Ó Brádaigh del liderazgo de los Provos. Ó Brádaigh era dos veces comandante del IRA entre 1958 y 1962, presidente del Sinn Fein Provisional 1970-1983 y del Sinn Fein Republicano 1987-2009.

El nuevo liderazgo, sobre el cual existe la extendida creencia de que Gerry Adams era el personaje principal, junto con un grupo de militantes afines, tomó el control del IRA y del Sinn Féin; el encuentro anual de delegados del partido en 1986 vio cómo Ó Brádaigh y muchos de sus seguidores (lo que no incluía a Twomey) se marchaban para formar poco después el Republican Sinn Féin (desde entonces ligado al IRA de la Continuidad).

El IRA Provisional (y por un tiempo, el INLA, otra escisión del IRA Oficial), combatió en una guerra terrible contra un ejército imperialista moderno con sofisticados sistemas de vigilancia, contra la policía colón británica armada y contra los paramilitares lealistas, controlados por la policía británica y por los servicios de inteligencia militares.

Infligieron un gran número de bajas entre las fuerzas coloniales, pero también sufrieron muchas bajas ellos mismos. Cientos de ellos fueron encarcelados durante grandes periodos de tiempo, y entonces las prisiones mismas se convirtieron también en áreas de lucha.

El área de operaciones de los grupos republicanos estaba prácticamente confinada a los Seis Condados. El Sinn Féin Provisional organizó y llevó a cabo una serie de campañas en los 26 Condados, pero principalmente concentrados en lograr el apoyo para la lucha que se llevaba a cabo en el norte.

El Sinn Féin Provisional no trabajó de forma seria con el movimiento sindical, y cuando uno de sus miembros del Ard-Choiste (Comité Ejecutivo Nacional), Phil Flynn, era un alto cargo sindicalista, tomó parte en lograr un acuerdo de pacto social con el gobierno irlandés con el resultado que el movimiento sindical no fuese una amenaza real para los planes del capitalismo irlandés de ahí en adelante.

Buscando alianzas dentro de Irlanda, el Sinn Féin Provisional (antes y después de la escisión) realizó movimientos de confluencia hacia el ala “republicana” del Fianna Fáil.

El Sinn Féin Provisional no tomó parte en la lucha por la legalización de los preservativos y la píldora anti-conceptiva.Cuando se produjo el referéndum constitucional sobre el aborto, el Sinn Féin Provisional se mostró en contra, mientras que en el del divorcio respondió con evasivas. Cuando se produjo el referéndum acerca de entregar la nacionalidad a los hijos de inmigrantes que hubiesen nacido en Irlanda, su postura era a favor, pero no hicieron ninguna campaña al respecto, concentrándose en su lugar en promover el Acuerdo del Viernes Santo y discutiendo por la retención de las Cláusulas Constitucionales 2 y 3 (aquellas que reivindicaban para toda Irlanda). En otras palabras, en cuatro principales áreas de los derechos civiles, o se tomaron el bando equivocado o fallaron a la hora de movilizarse. Es notable que, en esas ocasiones, el Sinn Féin Provisional se posicionara a la derecha del Partido Laborista irlandés, de línea socialdemócrata.

El Sinn Féin Provisional tampoco se organizó en torno al asunto del desempleo y su consiguiente emigración, un problema que afectaba principalmente a la juventud de todas las capas sociales de Irlanda.

De hecho, el único problema social en el que actuaron con decisión fue en el tráfico de drogas. Aun así, incluso en ese caso, su punto de vista moralista les hacía tratar a todas las drogas igual, excepto por supuesto el alcohol, que vendían en sus clubs y al que ponían un impuesto ilegal en sus áreas, y el tabaco, con el que hacían contrabando a través de la frontera. Su solución al problema de la droga era intimidar a los camellos y conducirles fuera de las áreas donde se llevaban a cabo estas campañas. No obstante, hay persistentes rumores de que cobraban un impuesto a estos camellos en otras áreas como una de sus formas de financiación.

No era de esperar que la mayoría de la gente de los 26 Condados, privados de cualquier referente relativo a las cuestiones económicas y sociales que les afectaban, pudiese ser movilizada exclusivamente acerca de problemas que afectaban tan sólo a una pequeña parte de la población irlandesa, que además vivía bajo otra administración.

El apoyo popular de los Provisionales comenzó a menguar en los 26 Condados, ayudado por la hostilidad de su burguesía, sus medios de comunicación, y su entramado político, mientras que en los Seis Condados ocupados comenzó a calar la fatiga provocada por la guerra.

Fue la lucha de los presos políticos republicanos (principalmente hombres a veces pero con bastante actividad por las presas republicanas), dentro de las cárceles y de sus compañeros y compañeras en el exterior, en principio organizada principalmente por mujeres, la que inspiró nueva vida al movimiento republicano, particularmente en los Seis Condados. Primero la “protesta de la manta”, después la renuncia al aseo, y principalmente la “protesta sucia”, llevaron a la huelga de hambre de 1980. Fue seguida poco después por otra huelga de hambre, esta en 1981, que culminó con la muerte de diez prisioneros republicanos, siete del IRA Provisional y tres del INLA.

La lucha de estos prisioneros y la campaña de quienes les apoyaban galvanizó la comunidad nacionalista de los Seis Condados, y reactivó el movimiento Provisional. Esto también llevó a una exitosa intervención electoral en ambos lados de la frontera, con representación parlamentaria en ambas administraciones.

Trayectoria reformista

De ahí en adelante se puede observar una trayectoria reformista en los Provisionales, ligada a una guerra de guerrillas diseñada para presionar a los británicos y para mejorar la posición negociadora de los Provisionales. En 1998 los Provisionales firman el Acuerdo de Viernes Santo que ganó un apoyo mayoritario con un gran margen en un referéndum en los 26 Condados, y una mayoría raspada en las elecciones de los Seis Condados. De este modo, el Sinn Féin Provisional se convirtió electoralmente en el partido político dominante en la comunidad nacionalista y la segunda fuerza en el conjunto de los Seis Condados.

La estrategia electoral llevó a la primera escisión notable de la organización, de la cual rugió en el 1986 el Sinn Féin Republicano, que ha sido en numerosas ocasiones relacionado con el IRA de la Continuidad, que apareció en escena poco después. En el 1997 se produjo otra escisión de los Provos, de la que se formó el Movimiento por la Soberanía de los 32 Condados (32CSM), ligado normalmente al IRA Auténtico. El 32CSM se escindió después, y los herederos de tal escisión se encuentran en la Red Republicana para la Unidad (RNU). Después de la firma del Acuerdo de Viernes Santo en 1998, un conjunto de personas que dejaron el Sinn Féin (y algunos el IRA) Provisional formaron la organización éirígí (“Alzáos”). Todas estas organizaciones se oponen al Acuerdo de Viernes Santo, al igual que otros pequeños grupos. Todas se declaran socialistas, pero ninguna de ellas está construyendo bases en los sindicatos o en las instituciones educativas, y poco es el trabajo sobre cuestiones sociales y de vivienda en las comunidades.

En las elecciones del 2011 en los 26 Condados (el Estado Irlandés), el partido gobernante, Fianna Fáil, vio duramente reducido su número de votos, debido a una letanía de escándalos financiero-políticos combinados con la crisis financiera del sistema capitalista, durante la cual el gobierno pagó a los especuladores del Banco Anglo-Irlandés con dinero público. Sus jóvenes compañeros de coalición, el Partido Verde, vio su representación completamente eliminada.

El triunfador fue el otro partido burgués, Fine Gael, en coalición con los socialdemócratas del Partido Laborista irlandés. Estos esencialmente continuaron aplicando las políticas de sus predecesores. El Sinn Féin obtuvo 14 escaños, otros 14 fueron para independientes (la mayoría de izquierda), y otros cuatro para dos grupos trotskistas.

La respuesta del Sinn Féin a la crisis ha sido hacer un llamamiento a la inversión interior y la creación de empleo, proclamando que había “una mejor manera, una manera más justa” de manejar la economía. Se han opuesto a los recortes en los 26 Condados (mientras los llevaban a cabo en los Seis) pero no han apoyado la campaña de negarse a registrarse o pagar el Impuesto sobre los Hogares (un nuevo impuesto). Esta fue la mayor campaña de desobediencia civil en la historia del estado y fue un éxito, pero el impuesto fue sustituido por otro, el Impuesto de Bienes Inmuebles, con el Departamento de Ingresos responsable de recoger el impuesto.

Dublin demonstration, 13April 2013, part of civil disobedience campaign against Household & Water Taxes which Sinn Féin did not support

Manifestación en Dublín, 13 Abril 2013, que forma parte de la campaña de desobediencia civil contra Los Impuestos del Hogar y del Agua, campaña que no apoyaba el Sinn Féin

En sus formas de organizarse, su énfasis en las elecciones, sus eslóganes, y su respuesta ante una campaña de desobediencia civil, el comportamiento del Sinn Féin en los 26 Condados se enmarca completamente dentro de la línea de un partido socialdemócrata burgués, con la distinción de que al contrario que muchos partidos socialdemócratas, no tiene historia o fuerza dentro del movimiento sindical. Su estrategia parece ser la de formar su propio espectáculo electoral para entrar en un gobierno de coalición con alguno de los partidos de la burguesía en algún momento del futuro.

La trayectoria de los Provisionales de sus inicios hasta el presente puede resumirse en la resistencia anti-imperialista en la colonia (la parte más pequeña del país), intentos de ganar el partido nacionalista burgués del sur (o al menos algún sector del mismo) para su bando, reformismo electoralista con presión militar hasta las negociaciones, después un completo reformismo electoralista en ambos lados de la frontera con participación en el gobierno capitalista e imperialista de la colonia.

La posible alternativa revolucionaria

Había una posible y viable alternativa. En los 26 Condados, hubiese significado movilizar a las masas populares en torno a los problemas sociales y económicos a los que se enfrentaban: desempleo, emigración, escasez de viviendas, falta de desarrollo, erosión de las zonas de habla gaélica, etc. Hubiese significado enfrentarse al capitalismo dominante, a sus partidos políticos, y a su Estado en sus políticas neo coloniales, escándalos, exención de impuestos, derroche de los recursos naturales y sus bases productivas… Para ello, el movimiento de resistencia podría haber construido sus bases en las comunidades, estudiantes y, de forma crucial, entre la clase obrera, organizándose dentro y a través del movimiento sindical, enfrentándose a los líderes socialdemócratas de los sindicatos y luchando contra su ideología y práctica del “pacto social” con la burguesía.

También hubiese significado organizar y liderar a la población en la defensa de sus derechos sociales: divorcio, métodos contraconceptivos, aborto, derechos LGTB, derechos de ciudadanía para inmigrantes, etc. Por supuesto, tres de estos cuatro temas hubiesen significado un conflicto abierto con la Iglesia Católica.

Entonces, la Iglesia misma hubiese tenido que ser atacada para exponer su larga historia de abusos.

En los Seis Condados, la resistencia nacionalista podría haber sido construida en el seno de movimientos populares combativos, siguiendo el modelo de apoyo a los “Hombres de la Manta” y las huelgas de hambre. Estas bases podrían haber sido movilizadas en torno a las políticas sectarias, la represión, el Ejército Británico, vivienda, desempleo, educación, e incluso en el movimiento sindical. Debido a que la comunidad católica sufría desproporcionadamente el desempleo, y la mayoría de los puestos de trabajo estaban reservados para la población protestante, el movimiento sindical hubiese sido el frente con más dificultad a la hora de progresar, pero aún así había posibilidades.

Tales campañas requerirían una disminución, y probablemente una re-dirección, de las acciones militares por parte del movimiento de resistencia. Las campañas electorales podrían haber tenido lugar, pero con el único objetivo de apoyar las luchas populares y de representarlas en las instituciones, no colaborar con éstas o formar parte del Estado.

Había posibilidades y opciones, para una resistencia viable y para la preparación de la revolución social en ambas partes del país, pero no para el movimiento republicano irlandés con su ideología dominante. Un proceso así hubiese requerido una ideología revolucionaria basada en la organización de la clase trabajadora como motor y fuerza dirigente de un movimiento revolucionario.

La mayor parte del republicanismo irlandés nunca ha estado cerca de seguir ese camino, y parece dificíl ver que lo estará.

Aliados en el exterior

Una nación pequeña, con una población total menor que la de Londres, necesita ayuda si quiere enfrentarse al poder del Imperio Británico y su fuerza militar. El republicanismo irlandés siempre ha tenido esto en cuenta, y en 1798 miraron hacia la Francia revolucionaria, en el siglo XVIII a los EEUU, en la primera parte del siglo XX a la Alemania Imperial, y después de nuevo a la EEUU.

Con una excepción, estas eran alianzas temporales y legítimas, pese a que las tormentas impidieron que la Armada de la Francia republicana atracase en Bantry en 1796 y la fuerza que pudo desembarcar en 1798 era demasiado pequeña y llegaba demasiado tarde como para marcar la diferencia, o pese a que el envío de armas por parte de Alemania en 1916 fuese interceptado y que en 1919 no estuviesen en posición de ayudar.

En los Estados Unidos

La excepción mencionada son los EEUU, que al menos desde 1866 en adelante no iba a apoyar a Irlanda en contra el Imperio Británico. La evidencia que permite concluir esto es la invasión feniana de Canadá en ese año, en la que un destacamento de veteranos irlandeses de la Guerra Civil Americana cruzó la frontera con Canadá (entonces colonia británica) apoyados con una fuerza aún mayor esperando en territorio estadounidense. En ese momento, EEUU estaba en una situación contradictoria con Gran Bretaña debido al apoyo reciente de ésta a la Confederación (el “Sur”). Aun así, EEUU cerró la frontera con Canadá, separando a la vanguardia feniana de la fuerza principal y arrestando a un buen número de fenianos (Hermandad Feniano Irlandés).

Hasta 1898, la política estadounidense había sido de imperialismo “interno”: la derrota de las tribus autóctonas y el re-poblamiento de sus tierras con colonos blancos que serían arrastrados bajo la hegemonía de EEUU. La Guerra Estados Unidos-México en 1848, debida a la anexión de Texas por parte de EEUU, tal vez podría ser citada como guerra imperialista, pero había una gran cantidad de población de origen estadounidense en ese territorio, y EEUU simplemente podría haber considerado parte de su territorio.

Pero en 1898, EEUU entró en guerra con el Imperio Español y se anexionó Puerto Rico, invadiendo también Cuba y Filipinas.

Una vez EE.UU. se hubo consolidado como una potencia imperialista a escala mundial, estaba interesado en reemplazar la influencia y el poder francés y británico con el suyo propio, primeramente en el continente Americano y tierras adyacentes, y después en Asia y Oriente Medio (por último en África). Pero no estaba interesado en la eliminación completa de estas potencias imperialistas, sino que más bien estaba encantado de dominar el mundo con Francia y Gran Bretaña como socios menores. Sobre arrebatarles colonias, sólo lo hubiese ocurrido para dominar tal territorio en su lugar. Era muy inocente por parte de los Provisionales creer que podrían apartar a EE.UU. de sus intereses imperialistas, por muy potente que fuese su grupo de presión americano-irlandés.

A medida que la guerra de los Provisionales contra Gran Bretaña en los setenta no mostraba signos de acabar pronto, empezaron a desarrollar relaciones de hermandad con otras organizaciones de liberación en varias partes del mundo, como el Movimiento de Liberación Nacional Vasco, Al Fatah, o el Consejo Nacional Africano (ANC). La relación con Al Fatah no se pretendía desarrollar a un gran nivel, especialmente durante las dos primeras décadas de la guerra irlandesa, debido a que los Provisionales no querían perder el apoyo del lobby burgués americano-irlandés y esperaban cierta ayuda de la Casa Blanca.

Clinton, Rabin & Arafat

Los Acuerdos de Oslo 1993; el presidente EE.UU demócrata Clinton supervisa el acuerdo entre el Presidente de los sionistas israelí Rabin, y Arafat, líder de la OLP. Debido a este acuerdo, la organización Al Fatah, del que Arafat era el líder, perdió su apoyo mayoritario entre los palestinos en los Territorios Ocupados, que posteriormente fue a Hamas.

Después de la actuación de Al Fatah en las negociaciones de Oslo y el “proceso de paz” palestino, la organización comenzó a perder el apoyo de la mayoría del pueblo palestino, y en los territorios ocupados fue reemplazada por Hamás.

El proceso en Sudáfrica parecía haber dado buenos resultados con un gobierno de la mayoría negra, pero con

South African police of the ANC government executed 34 miners in one day for striking against Anglo-American Platinum mine at Marikana.  A further10 had been killed in previous days.


Policía sudafricana del gobierno del CAN ejecutó a 34 mineros en un día de huelga contra la empresa Anglo American Platinum en Marikana. Unos diez mas habían muerto en días anteriores.

el paso de los años esa “victoria” ha demostrado estar hueca incluso para las personas más ingenuas, especialmente en las últimas semanas, con la masacre de los mineros en huelga por parte de la policía sudafricana enviada por el Consejo Nacional Africano.

El movimiento de liberación nacional vasca está actualmente en su propio proceso de “paz” que muestra muchos signos de ir en la misma dirección que el proceso irlandés y otros que buscan lograr o han logrado la estabilidad temporal del imperialismo.

Dentro de la Gran Bretaña

Dentro de la propia Gran Bretaña había otro lugar en el que encontrar aliados para el movimiento en Irlanda. El Sinn Féin Provisional había cerrado todas sus filiales allí en los setenta, pero mantenía relaciones abiertas con la izquierda anti-imperialista británica y con el ala izquierda del Partido Laborista, de carácter socialdemócrata.

Con la iniciativa Time To Go (“Es la hora de irse”) de los ochenta, intentó unirles, pero esa alianza se fragmentó debido al comportamiento manipulador y carente de principios del sector del Partido Laborista, encabezado por la parlamentaria Clare Short y por John McDonnell (ahora también parlamentario). La Time To Go acabó con tan sólo unos pocos burócratas del Partido Laborista, apoyados tanto por los trotskistas del SWP (Partido Socialista de los Trabajadores) como por el Partido Comunista de Gran Bretaña y, debido sobre todo a este último, de la pequeña Asociación Connolly de la comunidad irlandesa.

Pero perdieron el apoyo primero de la Campaña contra los Registros al Desnudo, seguido del Grupo de Representación Irlandesa en Gran Bretaña, y finalmente del Movimiento Tropas Fuera. Los Provisionales se mantuvieron al margen de estas peleas, pero de facto promocionaron la campaña Time To Go en Gran Bretaña. Se convocó una gran manifestación en Londres, en la que participaron organizaciones normalmente apartadas de la escena de solidaridad irlandesa, pero poco más salió de esa campaña.

Después, los Provisionales fundaron la amplia campaña Saoirse (“Libertad”) para construir la solidaridad con los prisioneros y prisioneras del republicanismo irlandés, pero redujeron su sección británica cuando comenzó a crecer en tamaño y actividad fuera de su control. La reemplazaron más tarde por Fuascailt (“Liberación”), una campaña más pequeña que también concluyeron al pedir a sus miembros que se uniesen a la Sociedad Wolfe Tone (organización partidaria del Sinn Féin).

El Movimiento Tropas Fuera comenzó a acercarse de nuevo a los Provisionales en el Comité por la Retirada Británica (originalmente un amplio comité que planeaba la conmemoración de la masacre del Domingo Sangriento en Derry), y toda la escena de solidaridad irlandesa comenzó a ser cada vez más pequeña, estando su mayor parte bajo control Provisional, con grupos republicanos más pequeños, y activistas y pequeños grupos no influidos por los Provisionales.

Las conmemoraciones anuales de las Huelgas de Hambre en Gran Bretaña se volvieron problemáticas desde que los Provisionales dejaron claro (sin dejarlo nunca por escrito) que no enviarían ponentes a ninguna conmemoración a la que fuesen ponentes de IRSP (Partido Republicano Socialista Irlandés, ligado al INLA). Como tres de los diez mártires de tales huelgas eran afines al IRSP, ponía a la organización de dichas conmemoraciones en una posición muy difícil. O cedían ante la exclusión y censura por parte de los Provisionales, o se oponían a ello y no tenían ponente del mayor de los grupos republicanos.

Durante la mayor parte de esas décadas, los Provisionales (y en menor medida el INLA, después también en IRA Auténtico –Real IRA– y en una ocasión el IRA Oficial) llevaron a cabo campañas de bombas en Inglaterra. Cierto número de las detonaciones del IRA, algunas por error y otras (en apariencia) deliberadas, mataron civiles. Una de esas explosiones, en 1974, aparentemente previo aviso fallido, mató e hirió a un buen número de civiles en Birmingham. Esto dio al Estado británico la legitimidad para aprobar el Acta de Prevención del Terrorismo, la cual facilitó la represión a gran escala de la comunidad irlandesa. Esto, combinado con las falsas acusaciones y condenas de los Seis de Birmingham, los Cuatro de Guildford, los Siete de Maguire y Judith Ward, junto con la campaña mediática británica, creó en la comunidad irlandesa una atmósfera de miedo e intimidación. Eso llevó a un grave parón de la solidaridad a la causa irlandesa hasta que las huelgas de hambre de 1981 galvanizaron la comunidad irlandesa y a partes de la izquierda británica.

La intención del IRA con su campaña de bombas parecía ser disminuir el apoyo de la clase dirigente británica por la guerra y aterrorizar al público para que presionara a su gobierno para retirarse de Irlanda. Sin embargo, estaba claro desde mediados de los setenta, si no antes, que el Estado británico estaba preparado invertir una gran cantidad de recursos financieros, militares, políticos, y judiciales para combatir en Irlanda.

Claramente, mantenerse ocupando los Seis Condados tenía gran importancia para la clase dominante británica más allá de la comprensión de la militancia republicana (y tal falta de comprensión parece mantenerse en el espectro del republicanismo irlandés hasta hoy en día).

Las masas británicas ya habían demostrado su deseo de que se retiraran las tropas de Irlanda en sondeos de opinión públicos. La campaña de bombas no hizo nada para aportar, sino que más bien creó un clima en el que la opinión pública toleraba el abuso de los derechos de la población irlandesa y su represión en Gran Bretaña, junto con la tolerancia de facto de la represión en los Seis Condados, incluyendo asesinatos por parte del Estado.

El Acta de Prevención del Terrorismo 1974 tenía como objetivo específico la comunidad irlandesa porque era la comunidad con más en juego a la hora de oponerse a lo que estaba ocurriendo en los Seis Condados y porque tenían acceso a los hechos, con lo que podían informar a sus amigos británicos, compañeros y compañeras de trabajo, etc.

A pesar de la falta de progreso en sus objetivos y a pesar de su efecto contraproducente, las campañas con bombas del IRA continuaron en Gran Bretaña esporádicamente hasta 1996. Dos años después, el Acuerdo del Viernes Santo marcó el final de cualquier posibilidad para los Provisionales de seguir con las explosiones, aunque otros grupos republicanos “disidentes” podrían hacer uso de esa misma táctica en el futuro.

De nuevo, había alternativas revolucionarias.

Si los Provisionales se hubiesen esforzado en la construcción de alianzas y la movilización, especialmente en ligarse a movimientos de masas sin tratar de controlarlos, el panorama de Inglaterra podría haber sido diferente.

El sector solidario de la comunidad irlandesa debería haber tenido permitido divergir en varios grupos y lealtades políticas pero siempre animado a formar un gran frente de solidaridad con la causa irlandesa de la retirada británica, con el mismo tipo apoyo amplio hacia los prisioneros y prisioneras republicanas. La comunidad irlandesa constituía alrededor del 10% de la población de las ciudades británicas, y suponía una enorme fuente potencial de solidaridad e información a través de sus enlaces sociales y con el sindicalismo, lo cual hubiese podido minar y sobrepasar la censura y propaganda de los medios de comunicación británicos.

Al mismo tiempo, la resistencia en Irlanda debería haber forjado conexiones con la clase obrera británica: quienes les explotan son a su vez opresores del pueblo irlandés. Estas conexiones deberían haber priorizado militantes y grupos revolucionarios por encima de socialdemócratas burocráticos y, de nuevo, mucho de esto podría haber sido realizado a través de la diáspora irlandesa (de aplastante mayoría obrera).

También se podrían haber construido alianzas con las comunidades asiáticas, afro-caribeñas, africanas, etc de Gran Bretaña, unas comunidades sujetas al racismo y a ataques xenófobos en Gran Bretaña y cuyas tierras natales están siendo exprimidas por el imperialismo británico.

Nada de esto hubiese sido fácil, pero a largo plazo podría haber sido mucho más productivo, y una serie de alianzas progresivas habrían significado la masificación de la solidaridad con la causa irlandesa en lugar de lo contrario.

Sin embargo, los provos (y también un caso común dentro de republicanismo irlandés) prefirieron oscilar entre las acciones militares tales como las bombas por un lado, y propuestas reformistas por el otro. Aquellos que fanfarronean de su grado de compromiso con las campañas militares y sus mártires, marginalizando la importancia de activistas solidarios, finalmente acabaron en la administración del Estado colonialjunto a los unionistas y colaborando con la policía colonial británica. A lo largo del proceso, rindieron el estatus de preso político por el cual tantas personas habían luchado y diez de ellas habían muerto en una huelga de hambre.

Conclusión

Stormont Building, seat of the British colonial government in Ireland since 1932 except during years of direct rule from Britain.  Sinn Fein have gone from revolutionary campaigning for its abolition and Britain getting out of Ireland to being part of the colonial government, the Northern Ireland Executive.

Stormont Building, sede del gobierno colonial británico en Irlanda desde 1932, excepto durante los años de gobierno directo de Gran Bretaña. Sinn Féin han pasado de la campaña revolucionaria para su abolición y para que la Gran Bretaña salga de Irlanda a formar parte del gobierno colonial, el Ejecutivo de Irlanda del Norte.

Una lucha militar en una pequeña parte de la isla nunca iba a tener la oportunidad de derrotar al imperialismo británico. Además, era necesaria la lucha de masas social y política en toda Irlanda, o al menos en gran parte de ella, para impedir que fuese confinada a una parte del pueblo irlandés, y finalmente contenida.

También eran necesarias alianzas internacionales de carácter revolucionario, no alianzas que pudiesen restringir y minar las demandas de la revolución irlandesa.

Además, alianzas con fuerzas revolucionarias en Gran Bretaña también hubiesen sido fundamentales y, en particular, una relación simbiótica de la lucha revolucionaria en cada país, alimentándose de las fuerzas compartidas pero sin depender la una de la otra.

Si en el momento en que Gran Bretaña ha enviado o considera enviar fuerzas armadas de represión a Irlanda, la clase dominante británica se enfrenta con estallidos revolucionarios en su tierra y en el extranjero, hubiese restringido considerablemente su habilidad para desplegar las tropas mientras al mismo tiempo detona el colapso de la moral y quizá el comienzo de motines entre sus propias Fuerzas Armadas.

Es posible derrotar al imperialismo británico, pero no con las políticas y métodos del movimiento republicano irlandés. Lo que se necesita es un movimiento socialista revolucionario de carácter obrero, que movilice a la población trabajadora irlandesa en torno a los problemas que los afectan de forma directa, practicando la solidaridad internacionalista y creando progresivamente tanto alianzas anti-imperialistas temporales como alianzas permanentes revolucionarias y de clase.

Por desgracia, tal movimiento u organización no existe en Irlanda en este momento.

(La versión dirigida a los irlandeses terminó con la siguiente pregunta: “¿No deberíamos construirla?”)

Deire-Fómhair/ Octubre 2012 (ligeramente revisado en enero 2014).

APÉNDICE

BREVE HISTORIA DE LA LUCHA DEL PUEBLO DE IRLANDA CONTRA EL COLONIALISMO INGLÉS Y IMPERIALISMO BRITÁNICO

En el siglo XII, Irlanda estaba parcialmente conquistada y colonizada por los normandos, que habían invadido y colonizado Inglaterra y Gales cien años antes. Los gobernantes normandos de Inglaterra habían llegado a acuerdos con los gobernantes sajones previos (que a su vez habían sido invasores y colonos de ciertas partes de la Bretaña celta), y comenzaron a llamarse “ingleses” (en gaélico se siguieron refiriendo a ellos de la misma manera que a sus predecesores, como Sacsannaigh, esto es: sajones; y en irlandés moderno aún se sigue haciendo: Sasannaigh).

Las contradicciones se desarrollaron entre estos ingleses y los colonizadores normandos originales de Irlanda,

Normans from Wales invaded Ireland in 1169 and established a colony.  They had conquered England in 1066.  Over time they became "the English" and extended their control until they ruled the whole of Ireland.

Normandos de Gales invadieron Irlanda en 1169 y establecieron una colonia. Habían conquistado Inglaterra en 1066. Con el tiempo se convirtieron en “Ingléses”, y extendieron su control hasta que gobernaron toda Irlanda.

a quienes los ingleses se referían como “viejos ingleses” (o, en ocasiones, como “ingleses degenerados”) y los irlandeses como Gall-Ghael (“irlandeses extranjeros”).

Los colonizadores normandos originales se habían mezclado con los nativos (excepto en la ciudad fortificada de Dublín y alrededores), aprendido gaélico irlandés, y adoptado muchas de sus costumbres, así como establecido alianzas mixtas. La exportación a Irlanda de la Reforma en la Iglesia de Enrique VIII e Isabel I, desde mediados del siglo XV a mediados del XVI, junto con las guerras del Parlamento contra sus reyes – Carlos I a principios del XVII y más tarde en ese mismo siglo, la liderada por Guillermo III contra Jacobo II – transformaron a los irlandeses descendientes de normandos en aliados irrevocables de los celtas nativos, y posteriormente ambos grupos de fundieron.

Las sucesivas plantaciones (colonizaciones masivas), dejaron muchas partes de Irlanda ocupadas por comunidades de un origen étnico diferente, de otra adscripción religiosa a la de los nativos, que hablaban otra lengua y ocupaban las mejores tierras, de las que habían sido expulsados los irlandeses. Sin embargo, los colonos continuaban siendo una minoría y eventualmente tuvieron que llegar a ciertos acuerdos con los nativos. Al mismo tiempo, estaba emergiendo una burguesía colonial (similar proceso estaba ocurriendo en lo que después serían los Estados Unidos de América) que veía sus intereses como diferentes en muchas maneras a los de Inglaterra y, como muchos de ellos eran presbiterianos, a los de la Iglesia anglicana (la Iglesia del Estado inglés) establecida en Irlanda. Estas contradicciones crecieron y se mezclaron con ideologías republicanas y anti monárquicas y, envalentonado por la rebelión de los colonos americanos (muchos de ellos presbiterianos) y la Revolución Francesa, un sector de esta burguesía irlandesa (de origen británico) se unió a los irlandeses nativos hacia el final del siglo XVIII y se declararon en rebelión abierta contra el dominio británico.

Notables of the United Irishmen, the first Republican movement in Ireland, mostly led by Presbyterians.  After the defeat of its 1798 insurrection, the Presbyterian community came under the idealogical control of the Orange Order and British Loyalism, which is where it has remained to this day.

Notables de los Irlandeses Unidos, el primer movimiento republicano en Irlanda, sobre todo dirigido por los presbiterianos. Después de la derrota de su insurrección de 1798, la comunidad presbiteriana quedó bajo el control ideológicos de la Orden de Orange y el lealismo británico, que es donde se ha mantenido hasta nuestros días.

Las rebeliones republicanas de 1798 (las tres mayores en el noreste, sudeste y oeste de Irlanda) no tuvieron éxito, pero muchos de los que permanecieron en Irlanda se consideraron en lo sucesivo como un solo pueblo, los irlandeses, siendo mayoría pero no todos de fe católica.

La excepción más notable se dio en ciertas partes de Úlster, donde en las consecuencias de la derrota de la rebelión del ’98, la Orden de Orange controló socialmente y más tarde dominio ideológicamente la gran mayoría de la enorme comunidad presbiteriana de allí. Las alianzas políticas de la mayoría de los presbiterianos de allí desde entonces al presente han permanecido fieles a la Monarquía Británica y su Estado. Como sus colonos en Irlanda, siempre se esforzaron por mantener Irlanda para la Corona Británica y a ellos mismos en ascendencia y, al principio del siglo XX, cuando ya no pudieron seguir haciéndolo, trataron de mantener la esquina de Irlanda donde eran más numerosos a salvo para Gran Bretaña y para sí mismos, sojuzgando a los irlandeses nativos bajo su dominio mediante la opresión sectaria y la discriminación en el empleo, vivienda, administración, política y ley.

Sin embargo, antes de esto, al principio del siglo XIX, los irlandeses (ahora una mezcla de nativos con normandos e ingleses asentados) del movimiento de la “Joven Irlanda” habían comenzado a preparar una nueva rebelión republicana. Pero la tragedia de la Gran Hambruna intervino: inanición, hambre, enfermedades y emigración masiva pusieron fuera de juego a la gran rebelión. Años más tarde, otra rebelión a gran escala fue detenida cuando las cuidadosas preparaciones de los Fenianos fueron echadas por tierra con un ataque preventivo de la policía y el ejército británico.

A medida que el final del siglo XIX se aproximaba, los irlandeses volvían a reafirmar su independentismo nacionalista, mediante medios de reforma parlamentaria, agitación agraria (más tarde también con luchas industriales), y preparativos para una insurrección armada. Mientras los Estados europeos y de más allá estaban atrapados en la Primera Guerra Mundial imperialista, los irlandeses se alzaron en una corta y fallida rebelión (Alzamiento de Pascua de 1916) que sin embargo fue seguida por una cruenta guerra de guerrillas (Guerra de la Independencia Irlandesa) en varias zonas de Irlanda.

En 1921 los británicos negociaron un acuerdo que les dejaba ocupando seis de los 32 condados de Irlanda, lo que llevó a la Guerra Civil Irlandesa en 1922 entre el recién nacido Estado irlandés y la mayoría de los anteriores rebeldes, que fueron derrotados.

El nuevo Estado irlandés estaba controlado por los representantes políticos y burocráticos de la burguesía nativa, que continuaba bajo la influencia económica y financiera de la potencia colonial, que también mantenía los seis condados bajo la administración local de la burguesía anglicana y presbiteriana con el control social de los lealistas de la Orden de Orange, y dominando a una minoría católica mediante la policía y el ejército.

El órgano de control social en los 26 condados era la Iglesia católica, conservadora y pro-capitalista.

Ningún gran cambió ocurrió hasta finales de la década de 1960, cuando la agitación comenzó por los derechos civiles en los Seis Condados, oponiéndose a la discriminación contra la minoría católica (casi todos descendientes de irlandeses y normando-irlandeses). A medida que la campaña por los derechos civiles se encontraba con la violencia desatada del Estado, más tarde respaldada por tropas de Gran Bretaña, la minoría católica continuó resistiendo mientras una parte de ella se enzarzó en una feroz guerra de guerrillas tanto urbana como rural. Esto continuó durante prácticamente treinta años, hasta que un acuerdo llevó a la mayoría de las fuerzas guerrilleras a la rendición (Acuerdo de Viernes Santo, 1998).

Ahora, poco más de diez años más tarde, la organización republicana que lideró la lucha contra la ocupación británica de Irlanda se ha incorporado a la administración local de la colonia británica de los Seis Condados y está buscando formar parte de la dirección política de la neo-colonia del resto de Irlanda. El Sinn Féin tiene Ministros en el Ejecutivo del Norte de Irlanda, que es la administración local del Estado colonial británico. El Ejecutivo lleva a cabo recortes en servicios para el pueblo de los Seis Condados, como parte de la estrategia capitalista de trasladar su crisis a la clase obrera, y también reduce los salarios. También administra las fuerzas policiales locales (PSNI), que anualmente refuerza provocativas marchas lealistas que atraviesan zonas católicas enfrentándose a la oposición de la población, y lleva a cabo el acoso tanto individual como comunitario en las áreas de resistencia.

Fin